SARS‑CoV‑2 mostly affects the respiratory system with clinical patterns ranging from the common cold to fatal pneumonia. During the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, owing to the high number of patients who were infected with SARS‑CoV‑2 and subsequently recovered, it has been shown that some patients with post-COVID-19 terminal respiratory failure need lung transplantation for survival. There is increasing evidence coming from worldwide observations that this procedure can be performed successfully in post-COVID-19 patients. However, owing to the scarcity of organs, there is a need to define the safety and efficacy of lung transplant for post-COVID-19 patients as compared to patients waiting for a lung transplant for other pre-existing conditions, in order to ensure that sound ethical criteria are applied in organ allocation. The Milan's Policlinic Lung Transplant Surgery Unit, with the revision of the National Second Opinion for Infectious Diseases and the contribution of the Italian Lung Transplant Centres and the Italian National Transplant Centre, set up a pivotal observational protocol for the lung transplant of patients infected and successively turned negative for SARS‑CoV‑2, albeit with lung consequences such as acute respiratory distress syndrome or some chronic interstitial lung disease. The protocol was revised and approved by the Italian National Institute of Health Ethics Committee. Description of the protocol and some ethical considerations are reported in this article.

Post-COVID-19 Lung Transplantation Italian Pivotal Protocol: Some Ethical Considerations / C. Petrini, D. Peritore, L. Riva, G. Floridia, S. Gainotti, P.A. Grossi, A.G. Castiglione, M. Beretta, F. Rea, M. Nosotti, L. Lombardini, M. Cardillo. - In: TRANSPLANTATION PROCEEDINGS. - ISSN 0041-1345. - 54:6(2022), pp. 1524-1527. [10.1016/j.transproceed.2022.05.011]

Post-COVID-19 Lung Transplantation Italian Pivotal Protocol: Some Ethical Considerations

M. Nosotti;
2022

Abstract

SARS‑CoV‑2 mostly affects the respiratory system with clinical patterns ranging from the common cold to fatal pneumonia. During the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, owing to the high number of patients who were infected with SARS‑CoV‑2 and subsequently recovered, it has been shown that some patients with post-COVID-19 terminal respiratory failure need lung transplantation for survival. There is increasing evidence coming from worldwide observations that this procedure can be performed successfully in post-COVID-19 patients. However, owing to the scarcity of organs, there is a need to define the safety and efficacy of lung transplant for post-COVID-19 patients as compared to patients waiting for a lung transplant for other pre-existing conditions, in order to ensure that sound ethical criteria are applied in organ allocation. The Milan's Policlinic Lung Transplant Surgery Unit, with the revision of the National Second Opinion for Infectious Diseases and the contribution of the Italian Lung Transplant Centres and the Italian National Transplant Centre, set up a pivotal observational protocol for the lung transplant of patients infected and successively turned negative for SARS‑CoV‑2, albeit with lung consequences such as acute respiratory distress syndrome or some chronic interstitial lung disease. The protocol was revised and approved by the Italian National Institute of Health Ethics Committee. Description of the protocol and some ethical considerations are reported in this article.
Settore MED/21 - Chirurgia Toracica
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2434/936507
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