There is still much controversy concerning the impact of gender on mortality during ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). The COVID-19 pandemic deeply affected the clinical history of these patients, both in terms of presentation time and management. Our study focuses on STEMI patients hospitalized during the darkest period of the pandemic. From a total of 283 patients, women represented 26.8% of the population, with a mean age of 72 ± 11.2 years vs. 64.7 ± 12.6 years in men. Anterior STEMI was the most represented with a mildly reduced ejection fraction (EF 48.3 ± 11.8%) similar between genders. Coronary angiography showed more extensive disease in man, while women presented with a higher Killip class at admission and a more pronounced anemic status. In-hospital and 1-year mortality of the whole cohort were 11.4% and 7.5%, respectively, with no significant differences between genders (14.5% women vs. 10.6% men, p = ns; 9.2% women vs. 7% man, p = ns). EF resulted in being the only independent predictor of mortality in the short-term and at 1-year follow up in both genders. In the acute phase, the only other independent predictor of mortality was COVID-19 infection, secondary to the higher rate of respiratory complications, without any difference in terms of major adverse cardiac events. The impact of COVID-19 infection on mortality was completely lost at 1-year follow up.

Impact of Female Gender on Acute and Mid-Term Mortality in Patients with ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction during the Pandemic Era / L. Barbieri, C.M. Avallone, A. D'Errico, D. Gentile, D. CIGNO MEMBO, G. Tumminello, S. Carugo. - In: WOMEN. - ISSN 2673-4184. - 2:3(2022 Jul 26), pp. 180-188. [10.3390/women2030019]

Impact of Female Gender on Acute and Mid-Term Mortality in Patients with ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction during the Pandemic Era

C.M. Avallone;A. D'Errico;D. Gentile;D. CIGNO MEMBO;G. Tumminello
Penultimo
;
S. Carugo
Ultimo
2022

Abstract

There is still much controversy concerning the impact of gender on mortality during ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). The COVID-19 pandemic deeply affected the clinical history of these patients, both in terms of presentation time and management. Our study focuses on STEMI patients hospitalized during the darkest period of the pandemic. From a total of 283 patients, women represented 26.8% of the population, with a mean age of 72 ± 11.2 years vs. 64.7 ± 12.6 years in men. Anterior STEMI was the most represented with a mildly reduced ejection fraction (EF 48.3 ± 11.8%) similar between genders. Coronary angiography showed more extensive disease in man, while women presented with a higher Killip class at admission and a more pronounced anemic status. In-hospital and 1-year mortality of the whole cohort were 11.4% and 7.5%, respectively, with no significant differences between genders (14.5% women vs. 10.6% men, p = ns; 9.2% women vs. 7% man, p = ns). EF resulted in being the only independent predictor of mortality in the short-term and at 1-year follow up in both genders. In the acute phase, the only other independent predictor of mortality was COVID-19 infection, secondary to the higher rate of respiratory complications, without any difference in terms of major adverse cardiac events. The impact of COVID-19 infection on mortality was completely lost at 1-year follow up.
STEMI care; gender; mortality; COVID-19;
Settore MED/11 - Malattie dell'Apparato Cardiovascolare
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2434/935373
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