The association between left atrial (LA) impairment and cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and between dyslipidaemia and CVD are well known. The present study aims to investigate the relationships between metabolic factors and LA dimensions and compliance, as well as test the hypothesis that metabolic factors influence LA function independent from hemodynamic mechanisms. Arterial blood pressure (BP), waist and hip circumference, metabolic indices, and a complete echocardiographic assessment were obtained from 148 selected inhabitants (M/F 89/59; age 20–86 years) of Linosa Island, who had no history of CVD. At enrollment, 27.7% of the subjects met the criteria for metabolic syndrome (MetS) and 15.5% for arterial hypertension (HTN). LA compliance was reduced in subjects with MetS compared to those without (53 27% vs. 71 29%, p = 0.04) and was even lower (32 17%, p = 0.01) in those with MetS and HTN. At multiple regression analysis, the presence of MetS independently determined LA maximal area (r = 0.56, p < 0.001), whereas systolic BP and the total cholesterol/HDL cholesterol ratio determined LA compliance (r = 0.41, p < 0.001). In an apparently healthy population with a high prevalence of MetS, dyslipidaemia seems to independently influence LA compliance. At a 5-year follow-up, LA compliance was reduced in both all-cause and CVD mortality groups, and markedly impaired in those who died of CVD. These findings may contribute to understanding the prognostic role of LA function in CVD and strengthen the need for early and accurate lipid control strategies.

Determinants of Left Atrial Compliance in the Metabolic Syndrome: Insights from the “Linosa Study” / P. Barbier, E. Palazzo Adriano, D. Lucini, M. Pagani, G. Cusumano, B. De Maria, L.A. Dalla Vecchia. - In: JOURNAL OF PERSONALIZED MEDICINE. - ISSN 2075-4426. - 12:7(2022 Jun 27), pp. 1044.1-1044.15. [10.3390/jpm12071044]

Determinants of Left Atrial Compliance in the Metabolic Syndrome: Insights from the “Linosa Study”

D. Lucini;
2022

Abstract

The association between left atrial (LA) impairment and cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and between dyslipidaemia and CVD are well known. The present study aims to investigate the relationships between metabolic factors and LA dimensions and compliance, as well as test the hypothesis that metabolic factors influence LA function independent from hemodynamic mechanisms. Arterial blood pressure (BP), waist and hip circumference, metabolic indices, and a complete echocardiographic assessment were obtained from 148 selected inhabitants (M/F 89/59; age 20–86 years) of Linosa Island, who had no history of CVD. At enrollment, 27.7% of the subjects met the criteria for metabolic syndrome (MetS) and 15.5% for arterial hypertension (HTN). LA compliance was reduced in subjects with MetS compared to those without (53 27% vs. 71 29%, p = 0.04) and was even lower (32 17%, p = 0.01) in those with MetS and HTN. At multiple regression analysis, the presence of MetS independently determined LA maximal area (r = 0.56, p < 0.001), whereas systolic BP and the total cholesterol/HDL cholesterol ratio determined LA compliance (r = 0.41, p < 0.001). In an apparently healthy population with a high prevalence of MetS, dyslipidaemia seems to independently influence LA compliance. At a 5-year follow-up, LA compliance was reduced in both all-cause and CVD mortality groups, and markedly impaired in those who died of CVD. These findings may contribute to understanding the prognostic role of LA function in CVD and strengthen the need for early and accurate lipid control strategies.
left atrial compliance; cardiovascular risk factors; metabolic syndrome; dyslipidaemia; echocardiography; cardiovascular prevention
Settore M-EDF/01 - Metodi e Didattiche delle Attivita' Motorie
Settore MED/09 - Medicina Interna
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2434/932730
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