When acting together, we may represent not only our own individual goals but also a collective goal. Although behavioural evidence suggests that agents' motor plans might be related to collective goals, direct neurophysiological evidence of whether collective goals are motorically represented is still scarce. The aim of the present transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) study is to begin to fill this gap. A participant and a confederate were asked to sequentially perform a two-choice reaction time task by acting on pressure sensors. In their own turn, they saw a cue indicating whether to lift their fingers from (or to press them on) a pressure sensor to shoot a ball across the screen as fast as possible. The confederate responded with the right hand, the participant with the left hand. While the confederate acted on the sensor, the participant's motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were collected from the right Extensor Carpi Ulnaris. If participants represent their own and the confederate's actions as being directed to a collective goal, MEPs amplitude should be modulated according to the action the confederate should perform. To test this conjecture, we contrasted three conditions: a Joint condition, in which both players worked together with their collective goal being to shoot the ball to get it to a common target, a Parallel condition, in which the players performed exactly the same task but received independent outcomes for their performance, and a Competitive condition, in which the outcome of the game still depended on the other player performance, but without the collective goal feature. Results showed no MEPs modulation according to the confederate's action in the Joint condition. Post-hoc exploratory analyses both provide some hints about this negative finding and also suggest possible improvements (i.e., adopting a different dependent variable, avoiding task-switching between conditions) for testing our hypothesis that collective goal can be represented motorically.

Sharing motor plans while acting jointly: a TMS study / G. Barchiesi, A. Zazio, E. Marcantoni, M. Bulgari, C. Barattieri di San Pietro, C. Sinigaglia, M. Bortoletto. - In: CORTEX. - ISSN 0010-9452. - 151:(2022 Jun), pp. 224-239. [10.1016/j.cortex.2022.03.007]

Sharing motor plans while acting jointly: a TMS study

G. Barchiesi
Primo
Methodology
;
C. Sinigaglia
Penultimo
Conceptualization
;
2022

Abstract

When acting together, we may represent not only our own individual goals but also a collective goal. Although behavioural evidence suggests that agents' motor plans might be related to collective goals, direct neurophysiological evidence of whether collective goals are motorically represented is still scarce. The aim of the present transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) study is to begin to fill this gap. A participant and a confederate were asked to sequentially perform a two-choice reaction time task by acting on pressure sensors. In their own turn, they saw a cue indicating whether to lift their fingers from (or to press them on) a pressure sensor to shoot a ball across the screen as fast as possible. The confederate responded with the right hand, the participant with the left hand. While the confederate acted on the sensor, the participant's motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were collected from the right Extensor Carpi Ulnaris. If participants represent their own and the confederate's actions as being directed to a collective goal, MEPs amplitude should be modulated according to the action the confederate should perform. To test this conjecture, we contrasted three conditions: a Joint condition, in which both players worked together with their collective goal being to shoot the ball to get it to a common target, a Parallel condition, in which the players performed exactly the same task but received independent outcomes for their performance, and a Competitive condition, in which the outcome of the game still depended on the other player performance, but without the collective goal feature. Results showed no MEPs modulation according to the confederate's action in the Joint condition. Post-hoc exploratory analyses both provide some hints about this negative finding and also suggest possible improvements (i.e., adopting a different dependent variable, avoiding task-switching between conditions) for testing our hypothesis that collective goal can be represented motorically.
Joint action; Motor evoked potentials; Motor representation; Registered report; Social neuroscience; TMS;
Settore M-PSI/02 - Psicobiologia e Psicologia Fisiologica
Settore BIO/09 - Fisiologia
   The cognitive neuroscience of interpersonal coordination and cooperation: a motor approach in humans and non-human primates
   MINISTERO DELL'ISTRUZIONE E DEL MERITO
   201794KEER_003

   Dipartimenti di Eccellenza 2018-2022 - Dipartimento di FILOSOFIA
   MINISTERO DELL'ISTRUZIONE E DEL MERITO
giu-2022
mar-2022
Article (author)
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
1-s2.0-S0010945222000831-main(1).pdf

accesso aperto

Tipologia: Publisher's version/PDF
Dimensione 1.99 MB
Formato Adobe PDF
1.99 MB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri
Pubblicazioni consigliate

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2434/920003
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 1
  • Scopus 2
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 2
social impact