Cadmium is a heavy metal with established adverse effects on human health, namely on bone, liver and kidney function and the cardiovascular system. We assessed cadmium exposure and its correlation with biomarkers of toxicity. We recruited 137 non-smoking blood donors without a history of chronic disease or cancer who resided in the Northern Italy province of Reggio Emilia (mean age 47 years, range 30–60 years) in the 2017–2019 period. We used a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire to estimate dietary cadmium intake and urine samples to assess concentrations of urinary cadmium and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG). Median urinary cadmium and 8-oxodG concentrations were 0.21 μg/L (interquartile range (IQR): 0.11–0.34 μg/L) and 3.21 μg/g creatinine (IQR: 2.21–4.80 μg/g creatinine), respectively, while median dietary cadmium intake was 6.16 μg/day (IQR: 5.22–7.93 μg/day). We used multivariable linear and spline regression models to estimate mean differences exposure concentrations. Dietary and urinary cadmium were positively correlated, and both were positively and linearly correlated with 8-oxodG. We found a positive association of urinary cadmium with blood alanine aminotransferase (ALT), total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) concentrations. We also observed a positive association with triglycerides, in both linear (beta regression coefficient = 77.03, 95% confidence interval 32.27–121.78) and non-linear spline regression analyses. Despite the positive correlation between dietary and urinary cadmium estimates, dietary cadmium intake showed inconsistent results with the study endpoints and generally weaker associations, suggesting a decreased capacity to reflect actual cadmium exposure. Overall, these findings suggest that even low levels of cadmium exposure may adversely alter hematological and biochemical variables and induce oxidative stress.

Associations of urinary and dietary cadmium with urinary 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine and blood biochemical parameters / T. Urbano, T. Filippini, L.A. Wise, D. Lasagni, T. De Luca, S. Sucato, E. Polledri, M. Malavolti, C. Rigon, A. Santachiara, T.A. Pertinhez, R. Baricchi, S. Fustinoni, M. Vinceti. - In: ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH. - ISSN 0013-9351. - 210:(2022 Jul), pp. 112912.1-112912.11. [10.1016/j.envres.2022.112912]

Associations of urinary and dietary cadmium with urinary 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine and blood biochemical parameters

S. Sucato;E. Polledri;S. Fustinoni
Penultimo
;
2022

Abstract

Cadmium is a heavy metal with established adverse effects on human health, namely on bone, liver and kidney function and the cardiovascular system. We assessed cadmium exposure and its correlation with biomarkers of toxicity. We recruited 137 non-smoking blood donors without a history of chronic disease or cancer who resided in the Northern Italy province of Reggio Emilia (mean age 47 years, range 30–60 years) in the 2017–2019 period. We used a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire to estimate dietary cadmium intake and urine samples to assess concentrations of urinary cadmium and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG). Median urinary cadmium and 8-oxodG concentrations were 0.21 μg/L (interquartile range (IQR): 0.11–0.34 μg/L) and 3.21 μg/g creatinine (IQR: 2.21–4.80 μg/g creatinine), respectively, while median dietary cadmium intake was 6.16 μg/day (IQR: 5.22–7.93 μg/day). We used multivariable linear and spline regression models to estimate mean differences exposure concentrations. Dietary and urinary cadmium were positively correlated, and both were positively and linearly correlated with 8-oxodG. We found a positive association of urinary cadmium with blood alanine aminotransferase (ALT), total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) concentrations. We also observed a positive association with triglycerides, in both linear (beta regression coefficient = 77.03, 95% confidence interval 32.27–121.78) and non-linear spline regression analyses. Despite the positive correlation between dietary and urinary cadmium estimates, dietary cadmium intake showed inconsistent results with the study endpoints and generally weaker associations, suggesting a decreased capacity to reflect actual cadmium exposure. Overall, these findings suggest that even low levels of cadmium exposure may adversely alter hematological and biochemical variables and induce oxidative stress.
8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine; Biomarkers of exposure; Cadmium; Environmental epidemiology; Toxicology; Triglycerides;
Settore MED/44 - Medicina del Lavoro
Article (author)
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
1-s2.0-S0013935122002390-main.pdf

accesso riservato

Tipologia: Publisher's version/PDF
Dimensione 3.52 MB
Formato Adobe PDF
3.52 MB Adobe PDF   Visualizza/Apri   Richiedi una copia
Pubblicazioni consigliate

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2434/916951
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 0
  • Scopus 2
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 2
social impact