Over the past 50 years, the Central Kalahari region of Botswana became a site of struggles over land and resources rights, identity, citizenship, and indigeneity. The policies of the government of Botswana towards the San express the dominant Tswana perspectives on humanity and what is considered human. Since independence in 1966 the goals of the government of Botswana have been to sedentarise the San and to transform them into ‘modern’ citizens who live in villages, keep livestock, and engage in agriculture and business. In this paper I analyse the case of the people of the Central Kalahari Game Reserve and their battles over rights and recognition as citizens of Botswana and as human beings. I examine how the government's decisions to deny Central Kalahari residents their distinct rights to natural resources such as wildlife—in spite of High Court decisions in the San's favour—as well as rights to services and development shared by other citizens—are linked to the dominant Tswana understanding of humanity.

Dispossession in the Age of Humanity: Human Rights, Citizenship, and Indigeneity in the Central Kalahari / M. Sapignoli. - In: ANTHROPOLOGICAL FORUM. - ISSN 0066-4677. - 25:3(2015), pp. 285-305. [10.1080/00664677.2015.1021293]

Dispossession in the Age of Humanity: Human Rights, Citizenship, and Indigeneity in the Central Kalahari

M. Sapignoli
2015

Abstract

Over the past 50 years, the Central Kalahari region of Botswana became a site of struggles over land and resources rights, identity, citizenship, and indigeneity. The policies of the government of Botswana towards the San express the dominant Tswana perspectives on humanity and what is considered human. Since independence in 1966 the goals of the government of Botswana have been to sedentarise the San and to transform them into ‘modern’ citizens who live in villages, keep livestock, and engage in agriculture and business. In this paper I analyse the case of the people of the Central Kalahari Game Reserve and their battles over rights and recognition as citizens of Botswana and as human beings. I examine how the government's decisions to deny Central Kalahari residents their distinct rights to natural resources such as wildlife—in spite of High Court decisions in the San's favour—as well as rights to services and development shared by other citizens—are linked to the dominant Tswana understanding of humanity.
Humanity; Indigeneity; Botswana; San; Human Rights
Settore M-DEA/01 - Discipline Demoetnoantropologiche
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2434/911262
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