The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) lockdown dramatically changed people’s lifestyles. Diet, physical activity, and the PNPLA3 gene are known risk factors for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Aim: To evaluate changes in metabolic and hepatic disease in NAFLD patients after the COVID-19 lockdown. Three hundred and fifty seven NAFLD patients were enrolled, all previously instructed to follow a Mediterranean diet (MD). Anthropometric, metabolic, and laboratory data were collected before the COVID-19 lockdown in Italy and 6 months apart, along with ultrasound (US) steatosis grading and information about adherence to MD and physical activity (PA). In 188 patients, PNPLA3 genotyping was performed. After the lockdown, 48% of patients gained weight, while 16% had a worsened steatosis grade. Weight gain was associated with poor adherence to MD (p = 0.005), reduced PA (p = 0.03), and increased prevalence of PNPLA3 GG (p = 0.04). At multivariate analysis (corrected for age, sex, MD, PA, and PNPLA3 GG), only PNPLA3 remained independently associated with weight gain (p = 0.04), which was also associated with worsened glycemia (p = 0.002) and transaminases (p = 0.02). During lockdown, due to a dramatic change in lifestyles, half of our cohort of NAFLD patients gained weight, with a worsening of metabolic and hepatologic features. Interestingly, the PNPLA3 GG genotype nullified the effect of lifestyle and emerged as an independent risk factor for weight gain, opening new perspectives in NAFLD patient care.

Interaction between lifestyle changes and PNPLA3 genotype in NAFLD patients during the COVID-19 lockdown / F. Cinque, A. Cespiati, R. Lombardi, A. Costantino, G. Maffi, F. Alletto, L. Colavolpe, P. Francione, G. Oberti, E. Fatta, C. Bertelli, G. Sigon, P. Dongiovanni, M. Vecchi, S. Fargion, A.L. Fracanzani. - In: NUTRIENTS. - ISSN 2072-6643. - 14:3(2022 Jan 27), pp. 556.1-556.12. [10.3390/nu14030556]

Interaction between lifestyle changes and PNPLA3 genotype in NAFLD patients during the COVID-19 lockdown

Cinque F.;Cespiati A.;Lombardi R.;Costantino A.;Maffi G.;Alletto F.;Colavolpe L.;Francione P.;Oberti G.;Fatta E.;Bertelli C.;Sigon G.;Dongiovanni P.;Fargion S.;Fracanzani A. L.
2022-01-27

Abstract

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) lockdown dramatically changed people’s lifestyles. Diet, physical activity, and the PNPLA3 gene are known risk factors for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Aim: To evaluate changes in metabolic and hepatic disease in NAFLD patients after the COVID-19 lockdown. Three hundred and fifty seven NAFLD patients were enrolled, all previously instructed to follow a Mediterranean diet (MD). Anthropometric, metabolic, and laboratory data were collected before the COVID-19 lockdown in Italy and 6 months apart, along with ultrasound (US) steatosis grading and information about adherence to MD and physical activity (PA). In 188 patients, PNPLA3 genotyping was performed. After the lockdown, 48% of patients gained weight, while 16% had a worsened steatosis grade. Weight gain was associated with poor adherence to MD (p = 0.005), reduced PA (p = 0.03), and increased prevalence of PNPLA3 GG (p = 0.04). At multivariate analysis (corrected for age, sex, MD, PA, and PNPLA3 GG), only PNPLA3 remained independently associated with weight gain (p = 0.04), which was also associated with worsened glycemia (p = 0.002) and transaminases (p = 0.02). During lockdown, due to a dramatic change in lifestyles, half of our cohort of NAFLD patients gained weight, with a worsening of metabolic and hepatologic features. Interestingly, the PNPLA3 GG genotype nullified the effect of lifestyle and emerged as an independent risk factor for weight gain, opening new perspectives in NAFLD patient care.
lockdown; Mediterranean diet; NAFLD; physical activity; PNPLA3; SARS-CoV-2; weight gain
Settore MED/09 - Medicina Interna
NUTRIENTS
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2434/906894
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