Introduction: In patients with primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP), a short course of steroids is routinely given as first-line therapy. However, the response is often transient and additional therapy is usually needed. Thrombopoietin receptor agonists (TPO-RAs) are frequently used as second-line therapy, although there is little clinical guidance on the timing of their administration and on tapering/discontinuation of the drug. To provide clinical recommendations, we used the Delphi technique to obtain consensus for statements regarding administration and on tapering/discontinuation of second-line TPO-RAs among a group of Italian clinicians with expertise in management of ITP. Methods: The Delphi process was used to obtain agreement on five statements regarding initiation and on tapering/discontinuation of second-line TPO-RAs. Agreement was considered when 75% of participants approved the statement. Eleven experts participated in the voting. Results: Full consensus was reached for three of the five statements. The experts held that an early switch from corticosteroids to a TPO-RA has the dual advantage of sparing patients from corticosteroid abuse and improve long-term clinical outcomes. All felt that dose reduction of TPO-RAs can be considered in patients with a stable response and platelet count >100 × 109/L that is maintained for at least 6 months in the absence of concomitant treatments, although there was less agreement in patients with a platelet count >50 × 109/L. Near consensus was reached regarding the statement that early treatment with a TPO-RA is associated with an increase in clinically significant partial or complete response. The experts also agreed that optimization of tapering and discontinuation of TPO-RA therapy in selected patients can improve the quality of life. Conclusion: The present consensus can help to provide guidance on use of TPO-RAs in daily practice in patients with ITP. Plain language summary: Second-line administration of thrombopoietin receptor agonists in immune thrombocytopenia There is little guidance on the timing of administration and tapering/discontinuation of thrombopoietin receptor agonists (TPO-RAs) in patients with primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP). The Delphi technique was used to obtain consensus for five statements. The present consensus among Italian clinicians aims to provide guidance on second-line use of TPO-RAs for patients with ITP in daily practice.

Second-line administration of thrombopoietin receptor agonists in immune thrombocytopenia: Italian Delphi-based consensus recommendations / M. Carpenedo, E. Baldacci, C. Barate, A. Borchiellini, F. Buccisano, G. Calvaruso, F. Chiurazzi, B. Fattizzo, G. Giuffrida, E. Rossi, F. Palandri, P.R. Scalzulli, S.M. Siragusa, A. Vitucci, F. Zaja. - In: THERAPEUTIC ADVANCES IN HEMATOLOGY. - ISSN 2040-6207. - 12(2021 Oct), pp. 20406207211048361.1-20406207211048361.9. [10.1177/20406207211048361]

Second-line administration of thrombopoietin receptor agonists in immune thrombocytopenia: Italian Delphi-based consensus recommendations

B. Fattizzo;G. Giuffrida;
2021

Abstract

Introduction: In patients with primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP), a short course of steroids is routinely given as first-line therapy. However, the response is often transient and additional therapy is usually needed. Thrombopoietin receptor agonists (TPO-RAs) are frequently used as second-line therapy, although there is little clinical guidance on the timing of their administration and on tapering/discontinuation of the drug. To provide clinical recommendations, we used the Delphi technique to obtain consensus for statements regarding administration and on tapering/discontinuation of second-line TPO-RAs among a group of Italian clinicians with expertise in management of ITP. Methods: The Delphi process was used to obtain agreement on five statements regarding initiation and on tapering/discontinuation of second-line TPO-RAs. Agreement was considered when 75% of participants approved the statement. Eleven experts participated in the voting. Results: Full consensus was reached for three of the five statements. The experts held that an early switch from corticosteroids to a TPO-RA has the dual advantage of sparing patients from corticosteroid abuse and improve long-term clinical outcomes. All felt that dose reduction of TPO-RAs can be considered in patients with a stable response and platelet count >100 × 109/L that is maintained for at least 6 months in the absence of concomitant treatments, although there was less agreement in patients with a platelet count >50 × 109/L. Near consensus was reached regarding the statement that early treatment with a TPO-RA is associated with an increase in clinically significant partial or complete response. The experts also agreed that optimization of tapering and discontinuation of TPO-RA therapy in selected patients can improve the quality of life. Conclusion: The present consensus can help to provide guidance on use of TPO-RAs in daily practice in patients with ITP. Plain language summary: Second-line administration of thrombopoietin receptor agonists in immune thrombocytopenia There is little guidance on the timing of administration and tapering/discontinuation of thrombopoietin receptor agonists (TPO-RAs) in patients with primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP). The Delphi technique was used to obtain consensus for five statements. The present consensus among Italian clinicians aims to provide guidance on second-line use of TPO-RAs for patients with ITP in daily practice.
consensus; Delphi; immune thrombocytopenia; management; second line; therapy; thrombopoietin receptor agonists
Settore MED/15 - Malattie del Sangue
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2434/905034
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