Regular medical supervision represents a fundamental component of the clinical management of obesity. In fact, when frequently supplied it reduces the risk of failure associated with any body weight reduction program (BWRP), resulting in body weight gain. The aim of the present study was to establish the potential beneficial effects of increasing medical supervision on weight loss and other auxometric and cardiometabolic parameters in a population of children and adolescents with obesity (n = 158; F/M = 94/64; age range 9.7–17.3 years; body mass index, BMI = 37.8 ± 6.9 kg/m2), followed up for one year in a real-world setting, after and before a 3-week in-hospital BWRP. Weight loss was significantly associated with medical supervision and changes in several auxometric and cardiometabolic parameters such as fat mass, fat-free mass, waist and hip circumferences, total and LDL cholesterols, triglycerides, glucose, insulin, HOMA-IR, systolic blood pressure and IDF criteria for the diagnosis of metabolic syndrome. As expected, weight loss and, congruently, medical supervision, were significantly higher in responsive and stable subjects than in those belonging to the non-responsive group and in responsive subjects than those belonging to the stable group. While weight loss was significantly higher in subjects having class 2 and 3 obesity than those belonging to class 1 obesity group, medical supervision was significantly higher in subjects having class 3 than those having class 1 obesity. Weight loss was significantly higher in subjects suffering from metabolic syndrome than those without; nevertheless, no significant difference was found in medical supervision between these groups. Finally, sex was associated with no differences in weight loss and medical supervision. In conclusion, based on the results of a real-world experience, frequent medical supervision increases the weight loss associated with a longitudinal multidisciplinary BWRP, with a parallel improvement of a set of auxometric and cardiometabolic parameters. Prospectively, incentivising regular medical supervision should reduce the risk of BWRP failure and body weight gain, thus contributing to counteract the detrimental transition from simple obesity to metabolic syndrome in pediatric patients.

Frequent medical supervision increases the effectiveness of a longitudinal multidisciplinary body weight reduction program: A real-world experience in a population of children and adolescents with obesity / A.E. Rigamonti, D. Caroli, G. Grugni, S.G. Cella, A. Sartorio. - In: NUTRIENTS. - ISSN 2072-6643. - 13:10(2021 Oct), pp. 3362.1-3362.12. [10.3390/nu13103362]

Frequent medical supervision increases the effectiveness of a longitudinal multidisciplinary body weight reduction program: A real-world experience in a population of children and adolescents with obesity

A.E. Rigamonti
Primo
;
S.G. Cella
Penultimo
;
2021-10

Abstract

Regular medical supervision represents a fundamental component of the clinical management of obesity. In fact, when frequently supplied it reduces the risk of failure associated with any body weight reduction program (BWRP), resulting in body weight gain. The aim of the present study was to establish the potential beneficial effects of increasing medical supervision on weight loss and other auxometric and cardiometabolic parameters in a population of children and adolescents with obesity (n = 158; F/M = 94/64; age range 9.7–17.3 years; body mass index, BMI = 37.8 ± 6.9 kg/m2), followed up for one year in a real-world setting, after and before a 3-week in-hospital BWRP. Weight loss was significantly associated with medical supervision and changes in several auxometric and cardiometabolic parameters such as fat mass, fat-free mass, waist and hip circumferences, total and LDL cholesterols, triglycerides, glucose, insulin, HOMA-IR, systolic blood pressure and IDF criteria for the diagnosis of metabolic syndrome. As expected, weight loss and, congruently, medical supervision, were significantly higher in responsive and stable subjects than in those belonging to the non-responsive group and in responsive subjects than those belonging to the stable group. While weight loss was significantly higher in subjects having class 2 and 3 obesity than those belonging to class 1 obesity group, medical supervision was significantly higher in subjects having class 3 than those having class 1 obesity. Weight loss was significantly higher in subjects suffering from metabolic syndrome than those without; nevertheless, no significant difference was found in medical supervision between these groups. Finally, sex was associated with no differences in weight loss and medical supervision. In conclusion, based on the results of a real-world experience, frequent medical supervision increases the weight loss associated with a longitudinal multidisciplinary BWRP, with a parallel improvement of a set of auxometric and cardiometabolic parameters. Prospectively, incentivising regular medical supervision should reduce the risk of BWRP failure and body weight gain, thus contributing to counteract the detrimental transition from simple obesity to metabolic syndrome in pediatric patients.
Adolescents; Body weight reduction program; Children; Medical supervision; Metabolic syndrome; Obesity; Real-world evidence; Adolescent; Child; Female; Humans; Linear Models; Longitudinal Studies; Male; Obesity; Weight Loss; Weight Reduction Programs
Settore BIO/14 - Farmacologia
Settore MED/13 - Endocrinologia
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2434/904684
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