: The activity of frontal motor areas during hand-object interaction is coordinated by dense communication along specific white matter pathways. This architecture allows the continuous shaping of voluntary motor output and, despite extensively investigated in non-human primate studies, remains poorly understood in humans. Disclosure of this system is crucial for predicting and treatment of motor deficits after brain lesions. For this purpose, we investigated the effect of direct electrical stimulation on white matter pathways within the frontal lobe on hand-object manipulation. This was tested in thirty-four patients (15 left hemisphere, mean age 42 years, 17 male, 15 with tractography) undergoing awake neurosurgery for frontal lobe tumour removal with the aid of the brain mapping technique. The stimulation outcome was quantified based on hand-muscle activity required by task execution. The white matter pathways responsive to stimulation with an interference on muscles were identified by means of probabilistic density estimation of stimulated sites, tract-based lesion-symptom (disconnectome) analysis and diffusion tractography on the single patient level. Finally, we assessed the effect of permanent tracts disconnection on motor outcome in the immediate postoperative period using a multivariate lesion-symptom mapping approach. The analysis showed that stimulation disrupted hand-muscle activity during task execution in 66 sites within the white matter below dorsal and ventral premotor regions. Two different EMG interference patterns associated with different structural architectures emerged: 1) an arrest pattern, characterised by complete impairment of muscle activity associated with an abrupt task interruption, occurred when stimulating a white matter area below the dorsal premotor region. Local mid-U-shaped fibres, superior fronto-striatal, corticospinal and dorsal fronto-parietal fibres intersected with this region. 2) a clumsy pattern, characterised by partial disruption of muscle activity associated with movement slowdown and/or uncoordinated finger movements, occurred when stimulating a white matter area below the ventral premotor region. Ventral fronto-parietal and inferior fronto-striatal tracts intersected with this region. Finally, only resections partially including the dorsal white matter region surrounding the supplementary motor area were associated with transient upper-limb deficit (p = 0.05; 5000 permutations). Overall, the results identify two distinct frontal white matter regions possibly mediating different aspects of hand-object interaction via distinct sets of structural connectivity. We suggest the dorsal region, associated with arrest pattern and post-operative immediate motor deficits, to be functionally proximal to motor output implementation, while the ventral region may be involved in sensorimotor integration required for task execution.

Stimulation of frontal pathways disrupts hand muscle control during object manipulation / L. Viganò, H. Howells, M. Rossi, M. Rabuffetti, G. Puglisi, A. Leonetti, A. Bellacicca, M. Conti Nibali, L. Gay, T. Sciortino, G. Cerri, L. Bello, L. Fornia. - In: BRAIN. - ISSN 0006-8950. - (2021 Oct 09). [Epub ahead of print] [10.1093/brain/awab379]

Stimulation of frontal pathways disrupts hand muscle control during object manipulation

Viganò L;Howells H;Rossi M;Puglisi G;Leonetti A;Bellacicca A;Conti Nibali M;Gay L;Sciortino T;Cerri G;Bello L;Fornia L
2021-10-09

Abstract

: The activity of frontal motor areas during hand-object interaction is coordinated by dense communication along specific white matter pathways. This architecture allows the continuous shaping of voluntary motor output and, despite extensively investigated in non-human primate studies, remains poorly understood in humans. Disclosure of this system is crucial for predicting and treatment of motor deficits after brain lesions. For this purpose, we investigated the effect of direct electrical stimulation on white matter pathways within the frontal lobe on hand-object manipulation. This was tested in thirty-four patients (15 left hemisphere, mean age 42 years, 17 male, 15 with tractography) undergoing awake neurosurgery for frontal lobe tumour removal with the aid of the brain mapping technique. The stimulation outcome was quantified based on hand-muscle activity required by task execution. The white matter pathways responsive to stimulation with an interference on muscles were identified by means of probabilistic density estimation of stimulated sites, tract-based lesion-symptom (disconnectome) analysis and diffusion tractography on the single patient level. Finally, we assessed the effect of permanent tracts disconnection on motor outcome in the immediate postoperative period using a multivariate lesion-symptom mapping approach. The analysis showed that stimulation disrupted hand-muscle activity during task execution in 66 sites within the white matter below dorsal and ventral premotor regions. Two different EMG interference patterns associated with different structural architectures emerged: 1) an arrest pattern, characterised by complete impairment of muscle activity associated with an abrupt task interruption, occurred when stimulating a white matter area below the dorsal premotor region. Local mid-U-shaped fibres, superior fronto-striatal, corticospinal and dorsal fronto-parietal fibres intersected with this region. 2) a clumsy pattern, characterised by partial disruption of muscle activity associated with movement slowdown and/or uncoordinated finger movements, occurred when stimulating a white matter area below the ventral premotor region. Ventral fronto-parietal and inferior fronto-striatal tracts intersected with this region. Finally, only resections partially including the dorsal white matter region surrounding the supplementary motor area were associated with transient upper-limb deficit (p = 0.05; 5000 permutations). Overall, the results identify two distinct frontal white matter regions possibly mediating different aspects of hand-object interaction via distinct sets of structural connectivity. We suggest the dorsal region, associated with arrest pattern and post-operative immediate motor deficits, to be functionally proximal to motor output implementation, while the ventral region may be involved in sensorimotor integration required for task execution.
EMG; diffusion tractography; hand motor control; intraoperative brain mapping; object manipulation
Settore MED/27 - Neurochirurgia
Article (author)
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
awab379.pdf

accesso aperto

Tipologia: Post-print, accepted manuscript ecc. (versione accettata dall'editore)
Dimensione 2.84 MB
Formato Adobe PDF
2.84 MB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri
Pubblicazioni consigliate

Caricamento pubblicazioni consigliate

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2434/902533
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 0
  • Scopus ND
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? ND
social impact