Background: The role of intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG) during sepsis is controversial, as different trials on IVIG have observed inconsistent survival benefits. We aimed to elucidate the possible association and clinical significance between circulating levels of immunoglobulins. Methods: In a subset of 956 patients with severe sepsis and septic shock of the multicentre, open-label RCT ALBIOS, venous blood samples were serially collected 1, 2, and 7 days after enrolment (or at ICU discharge, whichever came first). IgA, IgG and IgM concentrations were assayed in all patients on day 1 and in a subgroup of 150 patients on days 2 and 7. Ig concentrations were measured employing a turbidimetric assay, OSR61171 system. Results: IgA on day 1 had a significant predictive value for both 28-day and 90-day mortality (28-day mortality, HR: 1.50 (95% CI 1.18–1.92); 90-day mortality, HR: 1.54 (95% CI 1.25–1.91)). IgG, but not IgM, on day 1 showed similar results for 28-day (HR 1.83 (95% CI 1.33–2.51) and 90-day mortality HR: 1.66 (95% CI 1.23–2.25)). In addition, lower levels of IgG but not of IgA and IgM, at day 1 were associated with significantly higher risk of secondary infections (533 [406–772] vs 600 [452–842] mg/dL, median [Q1–Q3], p = 0.007). Conclusions: In the largest cohort study of patients with severe sepsis or septic shock, we found that high levels of IgA and IgG on the first day of diagnosis were associated with a decreased 90-day survival. No association was found between IgM levels and survival. As such, the assessment of endogenous immunoglobulins could be a useful tool to identify septic patients at high risk of mortality. Trial registration #NCT00707122, Clinicaltrial.gov, registered 30 June 2008.

Higher levels of IgA and IgG at sepsis onset are associated with higher mortality: results from the Albumin Italian Outcome Sepsis (ALBIOS) trial / L. Alagna, J.M.T.A. Meessen, G. Bellani, D. Albiero, P. Caironi, I. Principale, L. Vivona, G. Grasselli, F. Motta, N.M. Agnelli, V. Parrini, S. Romagnoli, R. Keim, F. Di Marzo Capozzi, F.S. Taccone, W. Taccone, B. Bottazzi, A. Bandera, A. Cortegiani, R. Latini. - In: ANNALS OF INTENSIVE CARE. - ISSN 2110-5820. - 11:1(2021 Nov 26), pp. 161.1-161.9. [10.1186/s13613-021-00952-z]

Higher levels of IgA and IgG at sepsis onset are associated with higher mortality: results from the Albumin Italian Outcome Sepsis (ALBIOS) trial

P. Caironi;L. Vivona;G. Grasselli;A. Bandera;
2021-11-26

Abstract

Background: The role of intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG) during sepsis is controversial, as different trials on IVIG have observed inconsistent survival benefits. We aimed to elucidate the possible association and clinical significance between circulating levels of immunoglobulins. Methods: In a subset of 956 patients with severe sepsis and septic shock of the multicentre, open-label RCT ALBIOS, venous blood samples were serially collected 1, 2, and 7 days after enrolment (or at ICU discharge, whichever came first). IgA, IgG and IgM concentrations were assayed in all patients on day 1 and in a subgroup of 150 patients on days 2 and 7. Ig concentrations were measured employing a turbidimetric assay, OSR61171 system. Results: IgA on day 1 had a significant predictive value for both 28-day and 90-day mortality (28-day mortality, HR: 1.50 (95% CI 1.18–1.92); 90-day mortality, HR: 1.54 (95% CI 1.25–1.91)). IgG, but not IgM, on day 1 showed similar results for 28-day (HR 1.83 (95% CI 1.33–2.51) and 90-day mortality HR: 1.66 (95% CI 1.23–2.25)). In addition, lower levels of IgG but not of IgA and IgM, at day 1 were associated with significantly higher risk of secondary infections (533 [406–772] vs 600 [452–842] mg/dL, median [Q1–Q3], p = 0.007). Conclusions: In the largest cohort study of patients with severe sepsis or septic shock, we found that high levels of IgA and IgG on the first day of diagnosis were associated with a decreased 90-day survival. No association was found between IgM levels and survival. As such, the assessment of endogenous immunoglobulins could be a useful tool to identify septic patients at high risk of mortality. Trial registration #NCT00707122, Clinicaltrial.gov, registered 30 June 2008.
IgA; IgG; IgM Immunoglobulins; Mortality; Sepsis; Septic shock
Settore MED/17 - Malattie Infettive
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2434/900806
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