The nutritional management of preterm infants is a critical point of care, especially because of the increased risk of developing extrauterine growth restriction (EUGR), which is associated with worsened health outcomes. Energy requirements in preterm infants are simply estimated, so the measurement of resting energy expenditure (REE) should be a key point in the nutritional evaluation of preterm infants. Although predictive formulae are available, it is well known that they are imprecise. The aim of our study was the evaluation of REE and protein oxidation (Ox) in very low birth weight infants (VLBWI) and the association with the mode of feeding and with body composition at term corrected age. Methods: Indirect calorimetry and body composition were performed at term corrected age in stable very low birth weight infants. Urinary nitrogen was measured in spot urine samples to calculate Ox. Infants were categorized as prevalent human milk (HMF) or prevalent formula diet (PFF). Results: Fifty VLBWI (HMF: 23, PFF: 27) were evaluated at 36.48 ± 0.85 post-conceptional weeks. No significant differences were found in basic characteristics or nutritional intake in the groups at birth and at the assessment. No differences were found in the REE of HMF vs. PFF (59.69 ± 9.8 kcal/kg/day vs. 59.27 ± 13.15 kcal/kg/day, respectively). We found statistical differences in the protein-Ox of HMF vs. PFF (1.7 ± 0.92 g/kg/day vs. 2.8 ± 1.65 g/kg/day, respectively, p < 0.01), and HMF infants had a higher fat-free mass (kg) than PFF infants (2.05 ± 0.26 kg vs. 1.82 ± 0.35 kg, respectively, p < 0.01), measured with air displacement plethysmography. Conclusion: REE is similar in infants with a prevalent human milk diet and in infants fed with formula. The HMF infants showed a lower oxidation rate of proteins for energy purposes and a better quality of growth. A greater amount of protein in HMF is probably used for anabolism and fat-free mass deposition. Further studies are needed to confirm our hypothesis.

Energy Expenditure, Protein Oxidation and Body Composition in a Cohort of Very Low Birth Weight Infants / M. Perrone, C. Menis, P. Piemontese, C. Tabasso, D. Mallardi, A. Orsi, O. Amato, N. Liotto, P. Roggero, F. Mosca. - In: NUTRIENTS. - ISSN 2072-6643. - 13:11(2021), pp. 3962.1-3962.10. [10.3390/nu13113962]

Energy Expenditure, Protein Oxidation and Body Composition in a Cohort of Very Low Birth Weight Infants

C. Menis;F. Mosca
Ultimo
2021

Abstract

The nutritional management of preterm infants is a critical point of care, especially because of the increased risk of developing extrauterine growth restriction (EUGR), which is associated with worsened health outcomes. Energy requirements in preterm infants are simply estimated, so the measurement of resting energy expenditure (REE) should be a key point in the nutritional evaluation of preterm infants. Although predictive formulae are available, it is well known that they are imprecise. The aim of our study was the evaluation of REE and protein oxidation (Ox) in very low birth weight infants (VLBWI) and the association with the mode of feeding and with body composition at term corrected age. Methods: Indirect calorimetry and body composition were performed at term corrected age in stable very low birth weight infants. Urinary nitrogen was measured in spot urine samples to calculate Ox. Infants were categorized as prevalent human milk (HMF) or prevalent formula diet (PFF). Results: Fifty VLBWI (HMF: 23, PFF: 27) were evaluated at 36.48 ± 0.85 post-conceptional weeks. No significant differences were found in basic characteristics or nutritional intake in the groups at birth and at the assessment. No differences were found in the REE of HMF vs. PFF (59.69 ± 9.8 kcal/kg/day vs. 59.27 ± 13.15 kcal/kg/day, respectively). We found statistical differences in the protein-Ox of HMF vs. PFF (1.7 ± 0.92 g/kg/day vs. 2.8 ± 1.65 g/kg/day, respectively, p < 0.01), and HMF infants had a higher fat-free mass (kg) than PFF infants (2.05 ± 0.26 kg vs. 1.82 ± 0.35 kg, respectively, p < 0.01), measured with air displacement plethysmography. Conclusion: REE is similar in infants with a prevalent human milk diet and in infants fed with formula. The HMF infants showed a lower oxidation rate of proteins for energy purposes and a better quality of growth. A greater amount of protein in HMF is probably used for anabolism and fat-free mass deposition. Further studies are needed to confirm our hypothesis.
body composition; indirect calorimetry; preterm infants; resting energy expenditure; substrate oxidation
Settore MED/38 - Pediatria Generale e Specialistica
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2434/891786
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