Pelvic floor disorders (PFDs) include a series of conditions that can be poorly tolerated, negatively affecting the quality of life. Current treatment options show unsatisfactory results and new ones are therefore needed. Stem cell (SC) therapy might be an alternative treatment strategy. This systematic review aims to define the state of art of SC therapy for PFDs in clinical trials, by systematically reviewing the available evidence. A systematic search strategy was conducted up to November 7, 2020, in PubMed, Scopus, Cochrane Library, and ISI Web of Science. Preclinical studies on animal models were not considered. Studies were included when the patients were affected by any PFDs and cells were isolated, cultured, and characterized as SC. The study protocol was registered in PROSPERO (CRD42020216551). A total of 11 prospective clinical studies were included in the final assessment, specifically 7 single-arm studies dealing with SC therapy for stress urinary incontinence and 4 with anal incontinence. Among the latter, there were two prospective, single-arm studies and two randomized controlled trials. No papers concerning the use of SC for prolapse repair were retrieved. Due to the great heterogeneity, data pooling was not possible. Stem cell injection resulted in a safe procedure, with few mild adverse side effects, mostly related to harvesting sites. However, a clear beneficial impact of SC treatment for the treatment of pelvic floor disorders could not be demonstrated. Further larger targeted studies with control arms are needed before any conclusions can be made.

Stem Cells in Clinical Trials for Pelvic Floor Disorders: a Systematic Literature Review / S. Manodoro, M. Frigerio, M. Barba, S. Bosio, L.A. de Vitis, A.M. Marconi. - In: REPRODUCTIVE SCIENCES. - ISSN 1933-7191. - (2021). [Epub ahead of print] [10.1007/s43032-021-00745-6]

Stem Cells in Clinical Trials for Pelvic Floor Disorders: a Systematic Literature Review

A.M. Marconi
2021

Abstract

Pelvic floor disorders (PFDs) include a series of conditions that can be poorly tolerated, negatively affecting the quality of life. Current treatment options show unsatisfactory results and new ones are therefore needed. Stem cell (SC) therapy might be an alternative treatment strategy. This systematic review aims to define the state of art of SC therapy for PFDs in clinical trials, by systematically reviewing the available evidence. A systematic search strategy was conducted up to November 7, 2020, in PubMed, Scopus, Cochrane Library, and ISI Web of Science. Preclinical studies on animal models were not considered. Studies were included when the patients were affected by any PFDs and cells were isolated, cultured, and characterized as SC. The study protocol was registered in PROSPERO (CRD42020216551). A total of 11 prospective clinical studies were included in the final assessment, specifically 7 single-arm studies dealing with SC therapy for stress urinary incontinence and 4 with anal incontinence. Among the latter, there were two prospective, single-arm studies and two randomized controlled trials. No papers concerning the use of SC for prolapse repair were retrieved. Due to the great heterogeneity, data pooling was not possible. Stem cell injection resulted in a safe procedure, with few mild adverse side effects, mostly related to harvesting sites. However, a clear beneficial impact of SC treatment for the treatment of pelvic floor disorders could not be demonstrated. Further larger targeted studies with control arms are needed before any conclusions can be made.
Anal incontinence; Pelvic floor disorders; Regenerative medicine; Stem cells; Stress urinary incontinence; Systematic review; Tissue engineering
Settore MED/40 - Ginecologia e Ostetricia
1-ott-2021
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2434/880646
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