Background: Calcific tendinitis of the shoulder has a tendon involvement that could evolve to rotator cuff tear and shoulder osteoarthritis. This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence of glenohumeral osteoarthritis and rotator cuff tears in patients affected by calcific tendinitis at a minimum follow-up of 10 years after diagnosis. Methods: Patients diagnosed with calcific tendinitis of the shoulder with a minimum follow-up of 10 years were contacted and invited for a clinical and radiological evaluation. Information on the demographics, affected and dominant side, bilateral shoulder pain, type of treatment, habits, systemic or musculoskeletal diseases, reoperation of the index shoulder, and subjective satisfaction was collected. The clinical evaluation was performed using Constant–Murley score (CMS), American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Score (ASES), and numerical rating scale (NRS); isometric strength in forwarding flexion and abduction was also measured. Each patient also underwent an ultrasound examination to evaluate rotator cuff tendon integrity and a shoulder radiograph to evaluate osteoarthritis. Results: Seventy-nine patients were available for a phone interview, and 35 agreed to be examined. The mean age was 58.89 (± 7.9) years at follow-up. The prevalence of glenohumeral osteoarthritis was 17.14% in the study population, with significant progression in 14.29% of the cases, without rotator cuff full-thickness tears. x-Ray examination showed residual calcifications in 31 patients, with a mean diameter of 5.54 mm. In 30 cases, there was a reduction of the diameter; in 4 cases, the calcification increased in size; and in 1 case, the size did not change. The mean ASES score was 74.1 (± 22.7) in the group with calcifications larger than 2 mm and 89.4 (± 8.2) in patients with smaller calcifications (p = 0.08) without correlation with the type of treatment performed. Conclusions: Calcific tendinitis is a self-resolving disease without rotator cuff tears at long-term follow-up or degenerative glenohumeral progression.

Long-term evolution of calcific tendinitis of the rotator cuff : clinical and radiological evaluation 10 years after diagnosis / R. Compagnoni, A. Menon, S. Radaelli, F. Lanzani, M.B. Gallazzi, A. Tassi, P.S. Randelli. - In: JOURNAL OF ORTHOPAEDICS AND TRAUMATOLOGY. - ISSN 1590-9921. - 22(2021 Oct 26), pp. 42.1-42.10. [10.1186/s10195-021-00604-9]

Long-term evolution of calcific tendinitis of the rotator cuff : clinical and radiological evaluation 10 years after diagnosis

R. Compagnoni
Primo
;
A. Menon
Secondo
;
F. Lanzani;P.S. Randelli
Ultimo
2021

Abstract

Background: Calcific tendinitis of the shoulder has a tendon involvement that could evolve to rotator cuff tear and shoulder osteoarthritis. This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence of glenohumeral osteoarthritis and rotator cuff tears in patients affected by calcific tendinitis at a minimum follow-up of 10 years after diagnosis. Methods: Patients diagnosed with calcific tendinitis of the shoulder with a minimum follow-up of 10 years were contacted and invited for a clinical and radiological evaluation. Information on the demographics, affected and dominant side, bilateral shoulder pain, type of treatment, habits, systemic or musculoskeletal diseases, reoperation of the index shoulder, and subjective satisfaction was collected. The clinical evaluation was performed using Constant–Murley score (CMS), American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Score (ASES), and numerical rating scale (NRS); isometric strength in forwarding flexion and abduction was also measured. Each patient also underwent an ultrasound examination to evaluate rotator cuff tendon integrity and a shoulder radiograph to evaluate osteoarthritis. Results: Seventy-nine patients were available for a phone interview, and 35 agreed to be examined. The mean age was 58.89 (± 7.9) years at follow-up. The prevalence of glenohumeral osteoarthritis was 17.14% in the study population, with significant progression in 14.29% of the cases, without rotator cuff full-thickness tears. x-Ray examination showed residual calcifications in 31 patients, with a mean diameter of 5.54 mm. In 30 cases, there was a reduction of the diameter; in 4 cases, the calcification increased in size; and in 1 case, the size did not change. The mean ASES score was 74.1 (± 22.7) in the group with calcifications larger than 2 mm and 89.4 (± 8.2) in patients with smaller calcifications (p = 0.08) without correlation with the type of treatment performed. Conclusions: Calcific tendinitis is a self-resolving disease without rotator cuff tears at long-term follow-up or degenerative glenohumeral progression.
arthroscopy; calcific tendinitis; long-term follow-up; rotator cuff; shoulder; arthroscopy; cohort studies; humans; middle aged; rotator cuff; treatment outcome; rotator cuff injuries; tendinopathy
Settore MED/33 - Malattie Apparato Locomotore
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2434/879354
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