Lombardy has represented the Italian and European epicenter of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Although most clinical efforts within hospitals were diverted towards the care of virally infected patients, therapies for patients with cancer, including radiotherapy (RT), have continued. During both the first and second pandemic waves, several national and regional organizations provided Italian and Lombardian RT departments with detailed guidelines aimed at ensuring safe treatments during the pandemic. The spread of infection among patients and personnel was limited by adopting strict measures, including triage procedures, interpersonal distance, and adequate implementation of personal protective equipment (PPE). Screening procedures addressed to both the healthcare workforce and patients, such as periodic nasopharyngeal swabs, have allowed the early identification of asymptomatic or pauci-symptomatic COVID-19 cases, thus reducing the spread of the infection. Prevention of infection was deemed of paramount importance to protect both patients and personnel and to ensure the availability of a minimum number of staff members to maintain clinical activity. The choice of treating COVID-19–positive patients has represented a matter of debate, and the risk of oncologic progression has been weighted against the risk of infection of personnel and other patients. Such risk was minimized by creating dedicated paths, reserving time slots, applying intensified cleaning procedures, and supplying personnel and staff with appropriate PPE. Remote working of research staff, medical physicists, and, in some cases, radiation oncologists has prevented overcrowding of shared spaces, reducing infection spread.

Almost one year of COVID-19 pandemic : how radiotherapy centers have counteracted its impact on cancer treatment in Lombardy, Italy. CODRAL/AIRO-L study / B.A. Jereczek-Fossa, M.F. Palazzi, S. Tonoli, M. Zaffaroni, G. Marvaso, G.B. Ivaldi, M. Amadori, P. Antognoni, S. Arcangeli, A. Buffoli, G. Beltramo, M. Bignardi, S. Bracelli, A. De Stefani, S. Castiglioni, G. Catalano, N. Di Muzio, A. Cerrotta, L. Fariselli, A.R. Filippi, A. Gramaglia, C. Italia, P. Massaro, S.M. Magrini, S. Nava, E. Orlandi, N. Pasinetti, E.L. Sbicego, L. Scandolaro, M. Scorsetti, C. Barbonetti, R. Tortini, R. Valdagni, V. Vavassori, M. Pepa, L.F. Cazzaniga, C.P. Soatti. - In: TUMORI. - ISSN 0300-8916. - (2021 Apr 22). [Epub ahead of print] [10.1177/03008916211009974]

Almost one year of COVID-19 pandemic : how radiotherapy centers have counteracted its impact on cancer treatment in Lombardy, Italy. CODRAL/AIRO-L study

B.A. Jereczek-Fossa;G. Marvaso;R. Valdagni;
2021

Abstract

Lombardy has represented the Italian and European epicenter of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Although most clinical efforts within hospitals were diverted towards the care of virally infected patients, therapies for patients with cancer, including radiotherapy (RT), have continued. During both the first and second pandemic waves, several national and regional organizations provided Italian and Lombardian RT departments with detailed guidelines aimed at ensuring safe treatments during the pandemic. The spread of infection among patients and personnel was limited by adopting strict measures, including triage procedures, interpersonal distance, and adequate implementation of personal protective equipment (PPE). Screening procedures addressed to both the healthcare workforce and patients, such as periodic nasopharyngeal swabs, have allowed the early identification of asymptomatic or pauci-symptomatic COVID-19 cases, thus reducing the spread of the infection. Prevention of infection was deemed of paramount importance to protect both patients and personnel and to ensure the availability of a minimum number of staff members to maintain clinical activity. The choice of treating COVID-19–positive patients has represented a matter of debate, and the risk of oncologic progression has been weighted against the risk of infection of personnel and other patients. Such risk was minimized by creating dedicated paths, reserving time slots, applying intensified cleaning procedures, and supplying personnel and staff with appropriate PPE. Remote working of research staff, medical physicists, and, in some cases, radiation oncologists has prevented overcrowding of shared spaces, reducing infection spread.
AIRO-L; CODRAL; COVID-19; Lombardy; radiotherapy
Settore MED/36 - Diagnostica per Immagini e Radioterapia
Article (author)
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
33885350.pdf

accesso riservato

Tipologia: Publisher's version/PDF
Dimensione 175.45 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
175.45 kB Adobe PDF   Visualizza/Apri   Richiedi una copia
Pubblicazioni consigliate

Caricamento pubblicazioni consigliate

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2434/877795
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 0
  • Scopus 1
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 1
social impact