Background: Individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF) are deemed to have a higher risk of developing urinary incontinence (UI), likely due to repeated increasing pressure on the pelvic floor. We aimed to determine the prevalence of female UI in a large CF referral center, and to assess the association between UI and severity of CF disease. Methods: We consecutively recruited female patients regularly attending our CF center, aged ≥6 years and with a confirmed diagnosis of CF. Prevalence, severity, and impact of UI were assessed by administering two validated questionnaires. Relationship between variables was evaluated by means of multiple correspondence analysis, whereas a logistic model was fitted to capture the statistical association between UI and independent variables. Results: UI was present in 51/153 (33%, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 26%–41%) females. Among children and adolescents, the prevalence was 12/82 (15%, 95% CI: 8%–25%) whereas among adults was 39/71 (55%, 95% CI: 43%–67%). The only explanatory variable associated with UI was age, with children presenting the lowest risk (odds ratio, 0.32; 95% CI: 0.05–0.93). Females presenting low or high nutritional status show higher profile risk of having UI. Conclusions: Stress UI is a common complication in females with CF since childhood. Although it frequently occurs in older patients with a more severe phenotype, much attention should be paid to adults and to their nutritional status.

Prevalence and factors associated with urinary incontinence in females with cystic fibrosis : An Italian single-center cross-sectional analysis / A. Mariani, S. Gambazza, F. Carta, F. Ambrogi, A. Brivio, A.M. Bulfamante, V. Daccò, G. Bassotti, C. Colombo. - In: PEDIATRIC PULMONOLOGY. - ISSN 8755-6863. - (2021 Oct 12). [Epub ahead of print] [10.1002/ppul.25723]

Prevalence and factors associated with urinary incontinence in females with cystic fibrosis : An Italian single-center cross-sectional analysis

S. Gambazza
;
F. Ambrogi;A.M. Bulfamante;C. Colombo
2021

Abstract

Background: Individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF) are deemed to have a higher risk of developing urinary incontinence (UI), likely due to repeated increasing pressure on the pelvic floor. We aimed to determine the prevalence of female UI in a large CF referral center, and to assess the association between UI and severity of CF disease. Methods: We consecutively recruited female patients regularly attending our CF center, aged ≥6 years and with a confirmed diagnosis of CF. Prevalence, severity, and impact of UI were assessed by administering two validated questionnaires. Relationship between variables was evaluated by means of multiple correspondence analysis, whereas a logistic model was fitted to capture the statistical association between UI and independent variables. Results: UI was present in 51/153 (33%, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 26%–41%) females. Among children and adolescents, the prevalence was 12/82 (15%, 95% CI: 8%–25%) whereas among adults was 39/71 (55%, 95% CI: 43%–67%). The only explanatory variable associated with UI was age, with children presenting the lowest risk (odds ratio, 0.32; 95% CI: 0.05–0.93). Females presenting low or high nutritional status show higher profile risk of having UI. Conclusions: Stress UI is a common complication in females with CF since childhood. Although it frequently occurs in older patients with a more severe phenotype, much attention should be paid to adults and to their nutritional status.
cystic fibrosis; prevalence; urinary incontinence
Settore MED/01 - Statistica Medica
Settore MED/48 -Scienze Infermie.e Tecniche Neuro-Psichiatriche e Riabilitattive
Settore MED/38 - Pediatria Generale e Specialistica
12-ott-2021
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2434/875248
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