Objective: Since data from large retrospective observational studies and cancer registries became available, suggesting a benefit for patients undergoing surgery, the role of surgery in the treatment of small cell lung cancer (SCLC) needs to be reconsidered. The aim of this study was to evaluate outcomes and results of patients with SCLC undergoing intent-to-treat surgery. Material and methods: We retrospectively analyzed 324 patients (1998–2018) with a diagnosis of SCLC referred to our Institution. 65 patients underwent surgical resection with curative intent. Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analyses were used to compare overall survival (OS) for all patients. Results: Among the patients, 39 (60.0 %) patients had surgery upfront, whereas 24 (36.9 %) had surgery after chemotherapy (CT) alone, and 2 (3.1 %) after CT plus radiotherapy (RT). Twenty-nine (44.6 %) patients were stage I or had a complete response to induction treatment, 21 (32.3 %) had stage II, and 15 (23.1 %) stage III. Forty-four (67.7 %) patients underwent adjuvant treatment: 21 (32.3 %) had CT, 31 (47.7 %) RT, and 7 (10.8 %) both. Prophylactic cranial irradiation was administered in 15 patients (23.1 %). The median OS after initial diagnosis at 1, 5, 10 years was 1, 5, 10 years was 81.4 %, 41.4 % and 25.4 % respectively. Among patients who underwent surgical resection with curative intent, those with clinical stage I had a longer survival (5-year OS 62.9 %) p < 0.0001. Conclusion: patients with stage I SCLC could be considered the best candidates for surgery, in a multidisciplinary setting. Instead, considering their worse survival, those with stage II and III should be carefully selected for the surgical approach, and alternative therapy should be considered.

Surgery for small cell lung cancer : When and how / M. Casiraghi, G. Sedda, E. Del Signore, G. Piperno, P. Maisonneuve, F. Petrella, F. de Marinis, L. Spaggiari. - In: LUNG CANCER. - ISSN 0169-5002. - 152(2021), pp. 71-77. [10.1016/j.lungcan.2020.12.006]

Surgery for small cell lung cancer : When and how

M. Casiraghi
;
F. Petrella;L. Spaggiari
2021

Abstract

Objective: Since data from large retrospective observational studies and cancer registries became available, suggesting a benefit for patients undergoing surgery, the role of surgery in the treatment of small cell lung cancer (SCLC) needs to be reconsidered. The aim of this study was to evaluate outcomes and results of patients with SCLC undergoing intent-to-treat surgery. Material and methods: We retrospectively analyzed 324 patients (1998–2018) with a diagnosis of SCLC referred to our Institution. 65 patients underwent surgical resection with curative intent. Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analyses were used to compare overall survival (OS) for all patients. Results: Among the patients, 39 (60.0 %) patients had surgery upfront, whereas 24 (36.9 %) had surgery after chemotherapy (CT) alone, and 2 (3.1 %) after CT plus radiotherapy (RT). Twenty-nine (44.6 %) patients were stage I or had a complete response to induction treatment, 21 (32.3 %) had stage II, and 15 (23.1 %) stage III. Forty-four (67.7 %) patients underwent adjuvant treatment: 21 (32.3 %) had CT, 31 (47.7 %) RT, and 7 (10.8 %) both. Prophylactic cranial irradiation was administered in 15 patients (23.1 %). The median OS after initial diagnosis at 1, 5, 10 years was 1, 5, 10 years was 81.4 %, 41.4 % and 25.4 % respectively. Among patients who underwent surgical resection with curative intent, those with clinical stage I had a longer survival (5-year OS 62.9 %) p < 0.0001. Conclusion: patients with stage I SCLC could be considered the best candidates for surgery, in a multidisciplinary setting. Instead, considering their worse survival, those with stage II and III should be carefully selected for the surgical approach, and alternative therapy should be considered.
Small-cell lung cancer; Surgery; Survival
Settore MED/21 - Chirurgia Toracica
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2434/868717
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