The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has affected people’s psychological well-being, and hospitalized patients could face an even greater risk of psychological distress. We aimed to study resilience in recovered COVID-19 patients after hospital discharge. We recruited 50 patients (38 males, aged 28–77) who were hospitalized for COVID-19 between March and April 2020. Participants underwent a psychological assessment 5 months after hospital discharge. We administered the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC-25), Beck’s Depression inventory-II (BDI-II), and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory Y-form (STAI). We also evaluated the impact of persisting physical, behavioral, and cognitive symptoms on resilience. Patients reported low resilience in the months following hospital discharge (CD-RISC-25 score [mean ± SD] = 55.82 ± 20.76), compared to data from studies on the general population. Lower resilience was associated with mood disturbances in the months following clinical recovery (p = 0.005), persisting fatigue (p = 0.015), sleep changes (p = 0.046), and subjective cognitive complaints (p < 0.05). Recovered COVID-19 patients exhibit low resilience following hospital discharge, which affects psychological well-being. The presence of persisting symptoms following hospital discharge affects psychological resilience. Interventions tailored to increase resilience should be considered to improve quality of life for recovered COVID-19 patients.

Resilience, Psychological Well-Being and Daily Functioning Following Hospitalization for Respiratory Distress Due to SARS-CoV-2 Infection / M. Dini, B. Poletti, S. Tagini, M. Rita Reitano, E. Allocco, K. Mazzocco, G. Pravettoni, D. Bernardo, A. D'Arminio Monforte, S. Centanni, A. Priori, R. Ferrucci. - In: HEALTHCARE. - ISSN 2227-9032. - 9:9(2021 Sep), pp. 1161.1-1161.13. [10.3390/healthcare9091161]

Resilience, Psychological Well-Being and Daily Functioning Following Hospitalization for Respiratory Distress Due to SARS-CoV-2 Infection

M. Dini;K. Mazzocco;G. Pravettoni;D. Bernardo;A. D'Arminio Monforte;S. Centanni;A. Priori;R. Ferrucci
2021-09

Abstract

The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has affected people’s psychological well-being, and hospitalized patients could face an even greater risk of psychological distress. We aimed to study resilience in recovered COVID-19 patients after hospital discharge. We recruited 50 patients (38 males, aged 28–77) who were hospitalized for COVID-19 between March and April 2020. Participants underwent a psychological assessment 5 months after hospital discharge. We administered the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC-25), Beck’s Depression inventory-II (BDI-II), and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory Y-form (STAI). We also evaluated the impact of persisting physical, behavioral, and cognitive symptoms on resilience. Patients reported low resilience in the months following hospital discharge (CD-RISC-25 score [mean ± SD] = 55.82 ± 20.76), compared to data from studies on the general population. Lower resilience was associated with mood disturbances in the months following clinical recovery (p = 0.005), persisting fatigue (p = 0.015), sleep changes (p = 0.046), and subjective cognitive complaints (p < 0.05). Recovered COVID-19 patients exhibit low resilience following hospital discharge, which affects psychological well-being. The presence of persisting symptoms following hospital discharge affects psychological resilience. Interventions tailored to increase resilience should be considered to improve quality of life for recovered COVID-19 patients.
COVID-19; Persisting symptoms; Psychological well-being; Resilience
Settore M-PSI/08 - Psicologia Clinica
4-set-2021
Article (author)
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2434/866319
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