Disturbances of conscious awareness, or self-disorders, are a defining feature of schizophrenia. These include symptoms such as delusions of control, i.e. the belief that one’s actions are controlled by an external agent. Models of self-disorders point at altered neural mechanisms of source monitoring, i.e. the ability of the brain to discriminate self-generated stimuli from those driven by the environment. However, evidence supporting this putative relationship is currently lacking. We performed electroencephalography (EEG) during self-paced, brisk right fist closures in ten (M = 9; F = 1) patients with Early-Course Schizophrenia (ECSCZ) and age and gender-matched healthy volunteers. We measured the Readiness Potential (RP), i.e. an EEG feature preceding self-generated movements, and movement-related EEG spectral changes. Self-disorders in ECSCZ were assessed with the Examination of Anomalous Self-Experience (EASE). Patients showed a markedly reduced RP and altered post-movement Event-Related Synchronization (ERS) in the beta frequency band (14–24 Hz) compared to healthy controls. Importantly, smaller RP and weaker ERS were associated with higher EASE scores in ECSCZ. Our data suggest that disturbances of neural correlates preceding and following self-initiated movements may reflect the severity of self-disorders in patients suffering from ECSCZ. These findings point towards deficits in basic mechanisms of sensorimotor integration as a substrate for self-disorders.

Reduced readiness potential and post-movement beta synchronization reflect self-disorders in early course schizophrenia / F.L. Donati, M. Fecchio, D. Maestri, M. Cornali, C.C. Derchi, C. Casetta, M. Zalaffi, C. Sinigaglia, S. Sarasso, A. D'Agostino. - In: SCIENTIFIC REPORTS. - ISSN 2045-2322. - 11:1(2021 Dec), pp. 15044.1-15044.12. [10.1038/s41598-021-94356-5]

Reduced readiness potential and post-movement beta synchronization reflect self-disorders in early course schizophrenia

F.L. Donati
Primo
;
M. Fecchio
Secondo
;
D. Maestri;C.C. Derchi;C. Casetta;C. Sinigaglia;S. Sarasso
Penultimo
;
A. D'Agostino
Ultimo
2021-12

Abstract

Disturbances of conscious awareness, or self-disorders, are a defining feature of schizophrenia. These include symptoms such as delusions of control, i.e. the belief that one’s actions are controlled by an external agent. Models of self-disorders point at altered neural mechanisms of source monitoring, i.e. the ability of the brain to discriminate self-generated stimuli from those driven by the environment. However, evidence supporting this putative relationship is currently lacking. We performed electroencephalography (EEG) during self-paced, brisk right fist closures in ten (M = 9; F = 1) patients with Early-Course Schizophrenia (ECSCZ) and age and gender-matched healthy volunteers. We measured the Readiness Potential (RP), i.e. an EEG feature preceding self-generated movements, and movement-related EEG spectral changes. Self-disorders in ECSCZ were assessed with the Examination of Anomalous Self-Experience (EASE). Patients showed a markedly reduced RP and altered post-movement Event-Related Synchronization (ERS) in the beta frequency band (14–24 Hz) compared to healthy controls. Importantly, smaller RP and weaker ERS were associated with higher EASE scores in ECSCZ. Our data suggest that disturbances of neural correlates preceding and following self-initiated movements may reflect the severity of self-disorders in patients suffering from ECSCZ. These findings point towards deficits in basic mechanisms of sensorimotor integration as a substrate for self-disorders.
Settore BIO/09 - Fisiologia
Settore MED/25 - Psichiatria
Dipartimenti di Eccellenza 2018-2022 - Dipartimento di FILOSOFIA
22-lug-2021
Article (author)
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2434/865510
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