Human histoplasmosis is a mycosis caused by two distinct varieties of a dimorphic fungus: Histoplasma capsulatum var. capsulatum and H. capsulatum var. duboisii. In Europe, it is usu-ally imported by migrants and travellers, although there have been some autochthonous cases, especially in Italy; however, most European physicians are unfamiliar with its clinical and patho-logical picture, particularly among immunocompromised patients without HIV infection. This systematic review of all the cases of histoplasmosis reported in Europe and Israel between 2005 and 2020 identified 728 cases diagnosed in 17 European countries and Israel described in 133 arti-cles. The vast majority were imported (mainly from Central and South America), but there were also seven autochthonous cases (six in Europe and one in Israel). The patients were prevalently males (60.4%), and their ages ranged from 2 to 86 years. The time between leaving an endemic region and the diagnosis of histoplasmosis varied from a few weeks to more than 40 years. Progressive disseminated histoplasmosis was the most frequent clinical picture among people living with HIV infection (89.5%) or a different immunocompromising condition (57.1%), but it was also rec-orded in 6.2% of immunocompetent patients. Twenty‐eight cases were caused by Histoplasma du-boisii. Immunocompromised patients without HIV infection had the worst outcomes, with a mortality rate of 32%.

Histoplasmosis diagnosed in Europe and Israel: A case report and systematic review of the literature from 2005 to 2020 / S. Antinori, A. Giacomelli, M. Corbellino, A. Torre, M. Schiuma, G. Casalini, C. Parravicini, L. Milazzo, C. Gervasoni, A.L. Ridolfo. - In: JOURNAL OF FUNGI. - ISSN 2309-608X. - 7:6(2021 Jun), pp. 481.1-481.23. [10.3390/jof7060481]

Histoplasmosis diagnosed in Europe and Israel: A case report and systematic review of the literature from 2005 to 2020

S. Antinori
Primo
;
A. Giacomelli
Secondo
;
A. Torre;M. Schiuma;G. Casalini;
2021-06

Abstract

Human histoplasmosis is a mycosis caused by two distinct varieties of a dimorphic fungus: Histoplasma capsulatum var. capsulatum and H. capsulatum var. duboisii. In Europe, it is usu-ally imported by migrants and travellers, although there have been some autochthonous cases, especially in Italy; however, most European physicians are unfamiliar with its clinical and patho-logical picture, particularly among immunocompromised patients without HIV infection. This systematic review of all the cases of histoplasmosis reported in Europe and Israel between 2005 and 2020 identified 728 cases diagnosed in 17 European countries and Israel described in 133 arti-cles. The vast majority were imported (mainly from Central and South America), but there were also seven autochthonous cases (six in Europe and one in Israel). The patients were prevalently males (60.4%), and their ages ranged from 2 to 86 years. The time between leaving an endemic region and the diagnosis of histoplasmosis varied from a few weeks to more than 40 years. Progressive disseminated histoplasmosis was the most frequent clinical picture among people living with HIV infection (89.5%) or a different immunocompromising condition (57.1%), but it was also rec-orded in 6.2% of immunocompetent patients. Twenty‐eight cases were caused by Histoplasma du-boisii. Immunocompromised patients without HIV infection had the worst outcomes, with a mortality rate of 32%.
Diagnosis; Histoplasma capsulatum; Histoplasma duboisii; Histoplasmosis; HIV; Immunocompromise; Progressive disseminated histoplasmosis; Travellers
Settore MED/17 - Malattie Infettive
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2434/865259
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