Autosomal dominant hypophosphatemic rickets (ADHR) is an extremely rare form of genetic rickets caused by mutations in the fibroblast growth factor 23 gene. ADHR is characterized by hypophosphatemia secondary to isolated renal phosphate wasting. Only a few cases of ADHR have been reported in the literature to date. We describe the case of a 17-month-old girl who presented with severe failure to thrive (length: −4.08 standard deviation (SD), weight: −2.2 SD) and hypotonia. Hypophosphatemia, decreased tubular phosphate reabsorption (69%), and rachitic lesions were found. Genetic analysis showed the heterozygous variant c.536G>A (NM_020638.3:c.536G>A) in exon 3 of the FGF23 gene, leading to the diagnosis of ADHR. She was treated with phosphate salts and oral alfacalcidol. After 4 years of treatment, at 5 years of age, the patient’s ADHR resolved spontaneously. Considering the lack of knowledge regarding ADHR, we reviewed the literature to describe the features of this rare and poorly understood disease. Eleven ADHR pediatric cases have been described thus far, with cases tending to be more common in females than males. Similar to the general population, two groups of patients with ADHR can be described depending on the mutations present: patients with an R179 and R176 mutation have early-onset of disease and higher frequency of rickets, and a milder and late-onset of disease, respectively. Symptoms and disease severity may fluctuate. Spontaneous remission may occur during the pediatric age.

Autosomal dominant hypophosphatemic rickets: A case report and review of the literature / C. Mameli, A. Sangiorgio, V. Colombo, M. Gambino, L. Spaccini, E. Cattaneo, G.V. Zuccotti. - In: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH AND PUBLIC HEALTH. - ISSN 1661-7827. - 18:16(2021 Aug), pp. 8771.1-8771.10. [10.3390/ijerph18168771]

Autosomal dominant hypophosphatemic rickets: A case report and review of the literature

Mameli C.;Sangiorgio A.;Colombo V.;Gambino M.;Zuccotti G. V.
2021-08

Abstract

Autosomal dominant hypophosphatemic rickets (ADHR) is an extremely rare form of genetic rickets caused by mutations in the fibroblast growth factor 23 gene. ADHR is characterized by hypophosphatemia secondary to isolated renal phosphate wasting. Only a few cases of ADHR have been reported in the literature to date. We describe the case of a 17-month-old girl who presented with severe failure to thrive (length: −4.08 standard deviation (SD), weight: −2.2 SD) and hypotonia. Hypophosphatemia, decreased tubular phosphate reabsorption (69%), and rachitic lesions were found. Genetic analysis showed the heterozygous variant c.536G>A (NM_020638.3:c.536G>A) in exon 3 of the FGF23 gene, leading to the diagnosis of ADHR. She was treated with phosphate salts and oral alfacalcidol. After 4 years of treatment, at 5 years of age, the patient’s ADHR resolved spontaneously. Considering the lack of knowledge regarding ADHR, we reviewed the literature to describe the features of this rare and poorly understood disease. Eleven ADHR pediatric cases have been described thus far, with cases tending to be more common in females than males. Similar to the general population, two groups of patients with ADHR can be described depending on the mutations present: patients with an R179 and R176 mutation have early-onset of disease and higher frequency of rickets, and a milder and late-onset of disease, respectively. Symptoms and disease severity may fluctuate. Spontaneous remission may occur during the pediatric age.
Children; Fibroblast growth factor 23 gene; Hypophosphatemia; Rickets; Child; Female; Humans; Infant; Iron; Male; Mutation; Phosphates; Familial Hypophosphatemic Rickets; Fibroblast Growth Factors
Settore MED/38 - Pediatria Generale e Specialistica
INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH AND PUBLIC HEALTH
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2434/864656
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