Oxidative stress (OS), due to pro-oxidant species [reactive oxygen species (ROS)] excess not counterbalanced by endogenous antioxidant molecules [e.g., reduced glutathione (GSH)], is involved in the pathogenesis of human cancers, but few data are available on essential thrombocythemia (ET). This study aims to investigate OS in ET off-therapy patients. Thirty ET treatment-naïve patients were compared with 26 age-matched and gender-matched controls. Serum ROS, urinary 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, full blood GSH levels, and reduced/oxidized GSH ratio (GSH/GSSG) were measured. Data were adjusted for gender, age, JAK2 mutational status, smoking, dyslipidemia, or hypercholesterolemia requiring drug therapy, antiplatelet therapy, treatment with acetylsalicylic acid, high-sensitive C-reactive protein levels, and absolute monocyte count. ROS and GSH levels were increased in both patients and controls. Patients showed increased GSSG (p = 0.05), reduced GSH/GSSG ratio (p = 0.08), and similar 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine levels when compared with controls. No differences in OS parameters were found between JAK2-positive and JAK2-negative patients. Confounding factors did not modify the results. Our study suggests an OS condition in a cohort of treatment-naïve ET patients, not associated with JAK2 mutational status or with chronic inflammation situation. GSH/GSSG ratio, altered in ET patients because of increased GSSG levels, showed the presence of higher GSH levels in ET than controls as a possible compensatory mechanism of an excess of pro-oxidant production.

Oxidative status in treatment-naïve essential thrombocythemia: a pilot study in a single center / A. Iurlo, R. De Giuseppe, M. Sciume, D. Cattaneo, E. Fermo, C. De Vita, D. Consonni, R. Maiavacca, F. Bamonti, U. Gianelli, A. Cortelezzi. - In: HEMATOLOGICAL ONCOLOGY. - ISSN 0278-0232. - 35:3(2017), pp. 335-340. [10.1002/hon.2264]

Oxidative status in treatment-naïve essential thrombocythemia: a pilot study in a single center

R. De Giuseppe;D. Cattaneo;F. Bamonti;U. Gianelli;A. Cortelezzi
2017

Abstract

Oxidative stress (OS), due to pro-oxidant species [reactive oxygen species (ROS)] excess not counterbalanced by endogenous antioxidant molecules [e.g., reduced glutathione (GSH)], is involved in the pathogenesis of human cancers, but few data are available on essential thrombocythemia (ET). This study aims to investigate OS in ET off-therapy patients. Thirty ET treatment-naïve patients were compared with 26 age-matched and gender-matched controls. Serum ROS, urinary 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, full blood GSH levels, and reduced/oxidized GSH ratio (GSH/GSSG) were measured. Data were adjusted for gender, age, JAK2 mutational status, smoking, dyslipidemia, or hypercholesterolemia requiring drug therapy, antiplatelet therapy, treatment with acetylsalicylic acid, high-sensitive C-reactive protein levels, and absolute monocyte count. ROS and GSH levels were increased in both patients and controls. Patients showed increased GSSG (p = 0.05), reduced GSH/GSSG ratio (p = 0.08), and similar 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine levels when compared with controls. No differences in OS parameters were found between JAK2-positive and JAK2-negative patients. Confounding factors did not modify the results. Our study suggests an OS condition in a cohort of treatment-naïve ET patients, not associated with JAK2 mutational status or with chronic inflammation situation. GSH/GSSG ratio, altered in ET patients because of increased GSSG levels, showed the presence of higher GSH levels in ET than controls as a possible compensatory mechanism of an excess of pro-oxidant production.
essential thrombocythemia; glutathione; oxidative stress; reactive oxygen species
Settore MED/15 - Malattie del Sangue
Article (author)
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.
Pubblicazioni consigliate

Caricamento pubblicazioni consigliate

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2434/859500
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 0
  • Scopus 3
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 1
social impact