Current sensor systems are used to detect cows with clinical mastitis. Although, the systems perform well enough to not negatively affect the adoption of automatic milking systems, the performance is far from perfect. An important advantage of sensor systems is the availability of multiple measurements per day. By clearly defining the need for detection of subclinical mastitis (SCM) and clinical mastitis (CM) from the farmers' management perspective, detection and management of SCM and CM may be improved. Sensor systems may also be used for other aspects of mastitis management. In this paper we have defined 4 mastitis situations that could be managed with the support of sensor systems. Because of differences in the associated management and the epidemiology of these specific mastitis situations, the required demands for performance of the sensor systems do differ. The 4 defined mastitis situations with the requirements of performance are the following: (1) Cows with severe CM needing immediate attention. Sensor systems should have a very high sensitivity (>95% and preferably close to 100%) and specificity (>99%) within a narrow time window (maximum 12 h) to ensure that close to all cows with true cases of severe CM are detected quickly. Although never studied, it is expected that because of the effects of severe CM, such a high detection performance is feasible. (2) Cows with mastitis that do not need immediate attention. Although these cows have a risk of progressing into severe CM or chronic mastitis, they should get the chance to cure spontaneously under close monitoring. Sensor alerts should have a reasonable sensitivity (>80%) and a high specificity (>99.5%). The time window may be around 7 d. (3) Cows needing attention at drying off. For selective dry cow treatment, the absence or presence of an intramammary infection at dry-off needs to be known. To avoid both false-positive and false-negative alerts, sensitivity and specificity can be equally high (>95%). (4) Herd-level udder health. By combining sensor readings from all cows in the herd, novel herd-level key performance indicators can be developed to monitor udder health status and development over time and raise alerts at significant deviances from predefined thresholds; sensitivity should be reasonably high, >80%, and because of the costs for further analysis of false-positive alerts, the specificity should be >99%. The development and validation of sensor-based algorithms specifically for these 4 mastitis situations will encourage situation-specific farmer interventions and operational udder health management

Novel ways to use sensor data to improve mastitis management / H. Hogeveen, I.C. Klaas, G. Dalen, H. Honig, A. Zecconi, D.F. Kelton, M. Sánchez Mainar. - In: JOURNAL OF DAIRY SCIENCE. - ISSN 0022-0302. - (2021 Jul 23). [Epub ahead of print] [10.3168/jds.2020-19097]

Novel ways to use sensor data to improve mastitis management

A. Zecconi;
2021-07-23

Abstract

Current sensor systems are used to detect cows with clinical mastitis. Although, the systems perform well enough to not negatively affect the adoption of automatic milking systems, the performance is far from perfect. An important advantage of sensor systems is the availability of multiple measurements per day. By clearly defining the need for detection of subclinical mastitis (SCM) and clinical mastitis (CM) from the farmers' management perspective, detection and management of SCM and CM may be improved. Sensor systems may also be used for other aspects of mastitis management. In this paper we have defined 4 mastitis situations that could be managed with the support of sensor systems. Because of differences in the associated management and the epidemiology of these specific mastitis situations, the required demands for performance of the sensor systems do differ. The 4 defined mastitis situations with the requirements of performance are the following: (1) Cows with severe CM needing immediate attention. Sensor systems should have a very high sensitivity (>95% and preferably close to 100%) and specificity (>99%) within a narrow time window (maximum 12 h) to ensure that close to all cows with true cases of severe CM are detected quickly. Although never studied, it is expected that because of the effects of severe CM, such a high detection performance is feasible. (2) Cows with mastitis that do not need immediate attention. Although these cows have a risk of progressing into severe CM or chronic mastitis, they should get the chance to cure spontaneously under close monitoring. Sensor alerts should have a reasonable sensitivity (>80%) and a high specificity (>99.5%). The time window may be around 7 d. (3) Cows needing attention at drying off. For selective dry cow treatment, the absence or presence of an intramammary infection at dry-off needs to be known. To avoid both false-positive and false-negative alerts, sensitivity and specificity can be equally high (>95%). (4) Herd-level udder health. By combining sensor readings from all cows in the herd, novel herd-level key performance indicators can be developed to monitor udder health status and development over time and raise alerts at significant deviances from predefined thresholds; sensitivity should be reasonably high, >80%, and because of the costs for further analysis of false-positive alerts, the specificity should be >99%. The development and validation of sensor-based algorithms specifically for these 4 mastitis situations will encourage situation-specific farmer interventions and operational udder health management
mastitis; sensor systems; management
Settore VET/05 - Malattie Infettive degli Animali Domestici
23-lug-2021
Article (author)
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2434/859358
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