Background Sexual dysfunction may be a side effect of treatment with antipsychotics, antidepressants, and other psychotropic drugs. Aim To review the evidence concerning male sexual dysfunctions in patients taking psychotropic drugs to provide specific information to nonpsychiatric physicians for the management of these dysfunctions. Methods A systematic search of Medline and Embase databases was performed up to October 15th, 2020. We included randomized controlled trials comparing the effects of psychotropic drugs versus placebo or versus another drug of the same class, for at least 5 weeks. Outcomes We considered studies whose male population could be evaluated separately from the female population and with a separate analysis of the different phases of the male sex cycle. Results We included 41 studies in the final review. There was a significant association between sexual dysfunction and antidepressant drug therapy, compared to placebo (decreased libido OR 1.89, 95% CI:1.40 to 2.56, 22 series, 11 trials, 7706 participants; erectile dysfunction OR = 2.28, 95% CI: 1.31 to 3.97; 11 trials, 3008 participants; ejaculatory dysfunction OR = 7.31, 95% CI: 4.38 to 12.20,19 trials, 3973 participants). When the effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) were evaluated separately from those of serotonin/norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), the use of SNRIs but not that of SSRIs was characterized by significantly higher odds of erectile dysfunction compared to placebo. Only limited data were found regarding the effects of antipsychotics on the phases of the male sexual cycle, as it was shown that aripiprazole and risperidone showed lower and higher odds for erectile or ejaculatory dysfunction, respectively, compared to other atypical antipsychotics. Clinical Implications Treatment of male sexual dysfunction in patients taking psychotropics requires a basic knowledge of the different drugs that affect sexual function with different mechanisms. Strengths & Limitations The effects of psychotropic drugs on erectile function and ejaculation were evaluated separately. The great variability of the mechanisms of action makes it difficult to make comparisons between the effects of the different classes of psychotropic drugs. Conclusions Administration of antipsychotics affects male sexual function with different mechanisms, although the increase in prolactin values associated with the administration of first-generation antipsychotics and some atypical, such as risperidone, seems to play a primary role in determining male sexual dysfunction. Most antidepressants cause decreased libido, ejaculatory and erectile dysfunction, however the administration of SNRIs appears to be possibly associated with a specific risk of erectile dysfunction.

Erectile and Ejaculatory Dysfunction Associated with Use of Psychotropic Drugs: A Systematic Review / M. Trinchieri, M. Trinchieri, G. Perletti, V. Magri, K. Stamatiou, T. Cai, E. Montanari, A. Trinchieri. - In: JOURNAL OF SEXUAL MEDICINE. - ISSN 1743-6095. - (2021), pp. 1-10. [Epub ahead of print] [10.1016/j.jsxm.2021.05.016]

Erectile and Ejaculatory Dysfunction Associated with Use of Psychotropic Drugs: A Systematic Review

E. Montanari
Penultimo
;
2021

Abstract

Background Sexual dysfunction may be a side effect of treatment with antipsychotics, antidepressants, and other psychotropic drugs. Aim To review the evidence concerning male sexual dysfunctions in patients taking psychotropic drugs to provide specific information to nonpsychiatric physicians for the management of these dysfunctions. Methods A systematic search of Medline and Embase databases was performed up to October 15th, 2020. We included randomized controlled trials comparing the effects of psychotropic drugs versus placebo or versus another drug of the same class, for at least 5 weeks. Outcomes We considered studies whose male population could be evaluated separately from the female population and with a separate analysis of the different phases of the male sex cycle. Results We included 41 studies in the final review. There was a significant association between sexual dysfunction and antidepressant drug therapy, compared to placebo (decreased libido OR 1.89, 95% CI:1.40 to 2.56, 22 series, 11 trials, 7706 participants; erectile dysfunction OR = 2.28, 95% CI: 1.31 to 3.97; 11 trials, 3008 participants; ejaculatory dysfunction OR = 7.31, 95% CI: 4.38 to 12.20,19 trials, 3973 participants). When the effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) were evaluated separately from those of serotonin/norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), the use of SNRIs but not that of SSRIs was characterized by significantly higher odds of erectile dysfunction compared to placebo. Only limited data were found regarding the effects of antipsychotics on the phases of the male sexual cycle, as it was shown that aripiprazole and risperidone showed lower and higher odds for erectile or ejaculatory dysfunction, respectively, compared to other atypical antipsychotics. Clinical Implications Treatment of male sexual dysfunction in patients taking psychotropics requires a basic knowledge of the different drugs that affect sexual function with different mechanisms. Strengths & Limitations The effects of psychotropic drugs on erectile function and ejaculation were evaluated separately. The great variability of the mechanisms of action makes it difficult to make comparisons between the effects of the different classes of psychotropic drugs. Conclusions Administration of antipsychotics affects male sexual function with different mechanisms, although the increase in prolactin values associated with the administration of first-generation antipsychotics and some atypical, such as risperidone, seems to play a primary role in determining male sexual dysfunction. Most antidepressants cause decreased libido, ejaculatory and erectile dysfunction, however the administration of SNRIs appears to be possibly associated with a specific risk of erectile dysfunction.
Anorgasmia; Antidepressants; Antipsychotics; Ejaculatory disorders; Erectile dysfunction; Psychotropic drugs; Sexual dysfunction
Settore MED/24 - Urologia
8-lug-2021
Article (author)
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
1-s2.0-S1743609521005233-main.pdf

accesso riservato

Tipologia: Publisher's version/PDF
Dimensione 1.42 MB
Formato Adobe PDF
1.42 MB Adobe PDF   Visualizza/Apri   Richiedi una copia
Pubblicazioni consigliate

Caricamento pubblicazioni consigliate

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2434/857909
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 2
  • Scopus 3
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 2
social impact