Introduction We aimed to examine the characteristics of antibiotic awareness campaigns (AAC) conducted on a national or regional level since 2010. Methods In October 2016, the WHO invited stakeholders involved in the planning or conduct of AACs to answer a web questionnaire. We solicited general information about the characteristics of the AAC, with a particular focus on key messages supporting optimal use of antibiotics. Results Stakeholders in 93 countries were contacted and 55 countries responded. Overall, 60 AACs from 16 low/middle-income countries (LMIC) and 31 high-income countries were identified. Forty-five campaigns (75%) were conducted on a national level and most of them (47/60; 78%) were organised by public health authorities and publicly funded. There were no major differences between LMICs and high-income countries in the types of key messages. The scientifically questionable 'Finish your prescription' slogan was used by 31 AACs (52%). A One Health approach was mentioned in 13/60 AACs (22%). Most messages were universally applicable; adaptation to locally prevalent public misconceptions was not systematic. The evaluation of the impact of campaigns was still incomplete, as only 18 AACs (30%) assessed their impact on antibiotic use. Conclusion For future AACs, it seems essential to base messages more rigorously on scientific evidence, context specificities and behavioural change theory. A new generation of messages that encourage first-choice use of narrow spectrum antibiotics is needed, reflecting international efforts to preserve broad spectrum antibiotic classes. Evaluation of the impact of AACs remains suboptimal.

How to improve antibiotic awareness campaigns: Findings of a WHO global survey / B. Huttner, M. Saam, L. Moja, K. Mah, M. Sprenger, S. Harbarth, N. Magrini. - In: BMJ GLOBAL HEALTH. - ISSN 2059-7908. - 4:3(2019), pp. e001239.1-e001239.9. [10.1136/bmjgh-2018-001239]

How to improve antibiotic awareness campaigns: Findings of a WHO global survey

L. Moja;
2019

Abstract

Introduction We aimed to examine the characteristics of antibiotic awareness campaigns (AAC) conducted on a national or regional level since 2010. Methods In October 2016, the WHO invited stakeholders involved in the planning or conduct of AACs to answer a web questionnaire. We solicited general information about the characteristics of the AAC, with a particular focus on key messages supporting optimal use of antibiotics. Results Stakeholders in 93 countries were contacted and 55 countries responded. Overall, 60 AACs from 16 low/middle-income countries (LMIC) and 31 high-income countries were identified. Forty-five campaigns (75%) were conducted on a national level and most of them (47/60; 78%) were organised by public health authorities and publicly funded. There were no major differences between LMICs and high-income countries in the types of key messages. The scientifically questionable 'Finish your prescription' slogan was used by 31 AACs (52%). A One Health approach was mentioned in 13/60 AACs (22%). Most messages were universally applicable; adaptation to locally prevalent public misconceptions was not systematic. The evaluation of the impact of campaigns was still incomplete, as only 18 AACs (30%) assessed their impact on antibiotic use. Conclusion For future AACs, it seems essential to base messages more rigorously on scientific evidence, context specificities and behavioural change theory. A new generation of messages that encourage first-choice use of narrow spectrum antibiotics is needed, reflecting international efforts to preserve broad spectrum antibiotic classes. Evaluation of the impact of AACs remains suboptimal.
Public knowledge; resistance; impact; stewardship; consumption; influenza; drivers; France; Europe; care
Settore MED/42 - Igiene Generale e Applicata
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2434/853479
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