Analysis of spatiotemporal partitioning is pivotal to shed light on interspecific coexistence. Most research effort has involved large-sized carnivores and their prey, whereas little attention has been devoted to lagomorphs. We assessed spatiotemporal overlap among the European brown hare Lepus europaeus and its potential competitors and predators through camera-trapping in an area in Central Italy. We estimated the interspecific patterns of the spatiotemporal activity rhythms of brown hares, its potential predators (the red fox Vulpes vulpes, the pine marten Martes martes, the domestic cat Felis catus, and the domestic dog Canis familiaris), and a competitor, the roe deer Capreolus capreolus. Brown hare activity was studied in natural conditions as well as in a fenced area that excluded terrestrial predators and competitors. Free-ranging hares developed a more nocturnal behavior to avoid diurnal predators (i.e., domestic carnivores and martens). Although high temporal overlap was observed between free-ranging brown hares and both red foxes (82%) and roe deer (81%), hares avoided fox by being more active on darkest nights, as well as avoided roe deer through spatial partitioning. We suggest that hares may adapt their spatiotemporal behavior to avoid potential predators and competitors.

Spatiotemporal overlap between the european brown hare and its potential predators and competitors / A. Viviano, E. Mori, N. Fattorini, G. Mazza, L. Lazzeri, A. Panichi, L. Strianese, W.F. Mohamed. - In: ANIMALS. - ISSN 2076-2615. - 11:2(2021), pp. 562.1-562.11.

Spatiotemporal overlap between the european brown hare and its potential predators and competitors

N. Fattorini;
2021

Abstract

Analysis of spatiotemporal partitioning is pivotal to shed light on interspecific coexistence. Most research effort has involved large-sized carnivores and their prey, whereas little attention has been devoted to lagomorphs. We assessed spatiotemporal overlap among the European brown hare Lepus europaeus and its potential competitors and predators through camera-trapping in an area in Central Italy. We estimated the interspecific patterns of the spatiotemporal activity rhythms of brown hares, its potential predators (the red fox Vulpes vulpes, the pine marten Martes martes, the domestic cat Felis catus, and the domestic dog Canis familiaris), and a competitor, the roe deer Capreolus capreolus. Brown hare activity was studied in natural conditions as well as in a fenced area that excluded terrestrial predators and competitors. Free-ranging hares developed a more nocturnal behavior to avoid diurnal predators (i.e., domestic carnivores and martens). Although high temporal overlap was observed between free-ranging brown hares and both red foxes (82%) and roe deer (81%), hares avoided fox by being more active on darkest nights, as well as avoided roe deer through spatial partitioning. We suggest that hares may adapt their spatiotemporal behavior to avoid potential predators and competitors.
Activity rhythms; Camera-traps; Lepus europaeus; Moonlight avoidance; Niche partitioning; Predator–prey systems; Spatiotemporal behavior
Settore BIO/05 - Zoologia
Settore BIO/07 - Ecologia
2021
Article (author)
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
animals-11-00562-v2.pdf

accesso aperto

Tipologia: Publisher's version/PDF
Dimensione 1.35 MB
Formato Adobe PDF
1.35 MB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri
Pubblicazioni consigliate

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2434/852477
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 6
  • Scopus 31
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 29
social impact