Background: In hemodialysis (HD) patients, central venous catheter (CVC) related bloodstream infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Hygienic precautions are a key aspect of dialysis care for infection prevention, but they are not sufficient to completely avoid the occurrence of CVC related infections. During the COVID-19 pandemic, hygienic precautions for preventing viral transmission have been markedly reinforced. We evaluated their effects on CVC-related infection rates. Methods: An observational retrospective study was conducted in two hemodialysis units of the same institution treating 215 chronic hemodialysis patients, 71 of whom are currently (33%) using a CVC. In the CVC cohort, we compared data on catheter-related infection rates during the maximum spread of the COVID-19 pandemic in Italy (February to May 2020) with data from the same period of the previous year and with the whole of 2019. Results: In 2019, we recorded a catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) rate of 1.19 (95% CI 0.81–1.68)/1000 days [2.07 (95% CI 1.12–3.52)/1000 days in the Feb-May 2019 period] and a tunnel and exit-site infection rate of 0.82 (95% CI 0.51–1.24)/1000 days [1.04 (95% CI 0.41–2.15)/1000 days in the Feb–May 2019 period]. Infection rates drastically decreased during the COVID-19 pandemic, with just one catheter-related bloodstream infection being recorded. Catheter-related bloodstream infection rates showed a significant reduction to 0.20 (95% CI 0.01–0.9)/1000 days (p < 0.05 and p < 0.005 compared to 2019 and to Feb-May 2019, respectively) and a non-significant reduction in tunnel and exit-site infections to 0.6 (95% CI 0.15–1.6)/1000 days. Conclusions: The observed 91% reduction in catheter-related bloodstream infections compared to the same period in 2019 [IRR 0.09 (95% CI 0.002–0.64)] and the 83% reduction compared to the whole of 2019 [IRR 0.17 (95% CI 0.004–1.009)] suggest that a stricter implementation of hygienic precautions in the dialysis setting can markedly improve the problem of CVC-related infections. Graphic abstract: [Figure not available: see fulltext.]

Targeting COVID-19 prevention in hemodialysis facilities is associated with a drastic reduction in central venous catheter-related infections / M. Heidempergher, G. Sabiu, M.A. Orani, G. Tripepi, M. Gallieni. - In: JN. JOURNAL OF NEPHROLOGY. - ISSN 1121-8428. - 34:2(2021 Apr), pp. 345-353. [10.1007/s40620-020-00900-3]

Targeting COVID-19 prevention in hemodialysis facilities is associated with a drastic reduction in central venous catheter-related infections

M. Heidempergher;G. Sabiu;M. Gallieni
2021-04

Abstract

Background: In hemodialysis (HD) patients, central venous catheter (CVC) related bloodstream infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Hygienic precautions are a key aspect of dialysis care for infection prevention, but they are not sufficient to completely avoid the occurrence of CVC related infections. During the COVID-19 pandemic, hygienic precautions for preventing viral transmission have been markedly reinforced. We evaluated their effects on CVC-related infection rates. Methods: An observational retrospective study was conducted in two hemodialysis units of the same institution treating 215 chronic hemodialysis patients, 71 of whom are currently (33%) using a CVC. In the CVC cohort, we compared data on catheter-related infection rates during the maximum spread of the COVID-19 pandemic in Italy (February to May 2020) with data from the same period of the previous year and with the whole of 2019. Results: In 2019, we recorded a catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) rate of 1.19 (95% CI 0.81–1.68)/1000 days [2.07 (95% CI 1.12–3.52)/1000 days in the Feb-May 2019 period] and a tunnel and exit-site infection rate of 0.82 (95% CI 0.51–1.24)/1000 days [1.04 (95% CI 0.41–2.15)/1000 days in the Feb–May 2019 period]. Infection rates drastically decreased during the COVID-19 pandemic, with just one catheter-related bloodstream infection being recorded. Catheter-related bloodstream infection rates showed a significant reduction to 0.20 (95% CI 0.01–0.9)/1000 days (p < 0.05 and p < 0.005 compared to 2019 and to Feb-May 2019, respectively) and a non-significant reduction in tunnel and exit-site infections to 0.6 (95% CI 0.15–1.6)/1000 days. Conclusions: The observed 91% reduction in catheter-related bloodstream infections compared to the same period in 2019 [IRR 0.09 (95% CI 0.002–0.64)] and the 83% reduction compared to the whole of 2019 [IRR 0.17 (95% CI 0.004–1.009)] suggest that a stricter implementation of hygienic precautions in the dialysis setting can markedly improve the problem of CVC-related infections. Graphic abstract: [Figure not available: see fulltext.]
Central venous catheter; COVID-19; Hemodialysis; Infection; Vascular access; Aged; COVID-19; Catheter-Related Infections; Central Venous Catheters; Comorbidity; Female; Humans; Incidence; Italy; Kidney Failure, Chronic; Male; Renal Dialysis; Retrospective Studies; SARS-CoV-2; Pandemics
Settore MED/14 - Nefrologia
28-dic-2020
Article (author)
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
Heidempergher2021_Article_TargetingCOVID-19PreventionInH.pdf

accesso aperto

Tipologia: Publisher's version/PDF
Dimensione 721.33 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
721.33 kB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri
Pubblicazioni consigliate

Caricamento pubblicazioni consigliate

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2434/850618
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 8
  • Scopus 8
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 10
social impact