Background: Precisely measuring the core body temperature during targeted temperature management after return of spontaneous circulation is mandatory, as deviations from the recommended temperature might result in side effects such as electrolyte imbalances or infections. However, previous methods are invasive and lack easy handling. A disposable, non-invasive temperature sensor using the heat flux approach (Double Sensor), was tested against the standard method: an esophagus thermometer.Methods: The sensor was placed on the forehead of adult patients (n = 25, M/F, median age 61 years) with return of spontaneous circulation after cardiac arrest undergoing targeted temperature management. The recorded temperatures were compared to the established measurement method of an esophageal thermometer. A paired t-test was performed to examine differences between methods. A Bland-Altman-Plot and the intraclass correlation coefficient were used to assess agreement and reliability. To rule out possible influence on measurements, the patients' medication was recorded as well.Results: Over the span of 1 year and 3 months, data from 25 patients were recorded. The t-test showed no significant difference between the two measuring methods (t = 1.47, p = 0.14, n = 1,319). Bland-Altman results showed a mean bias of 0.02 degrees C (95% confidence interval 0.00-0.04) and 95% limits of agreement of -1.023 degrees C and 1.066 degrees C. The intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.94. No skin irritation or allergic reaction was observed where the sensor was placed. In six patients the bias differed noticeably from the rest of the participants, but no sex-based or ethnicity-based differences could be identified. Influences on the measurements of the Double Sensor by drugs administered could also be ruled out.Conclusions: This study could demonstrate that measuring the core body temperature with the non-invasive, disposable sensor shows excellent reliability during targeted temperature management after survived cardiac arrest. Nonetheless, clinical research concerning the implementation of the sensor in other fields of application should be supported, as well as verifying our results by a larger patient cohort to possibly improve the limits of agreement.

Measuring core body temperature using a non-invasive, disposable double-sensor during targeted temperature management in post-cardiac arrest patients / D. Janke, N. Kagelmann, C. Storm, M. Maggioni, C. Kienast, H. Gunga, O. Opatz. - In: FRONTIERS IN MEDICINE. - ISSN 2296-858X. - 8(2021 May 05), pp. 666908.1-666908.9. [10.3389/fmed.2021.666908]

Measuring core body temperature using a non-invasive, disposable double-sensor during targeted temperature management in post-cardiac arrest patients

M. Maggioni;
2021-05-05

Abstract

Background: Precisely measuring the core body temperature during targeted temperature management after return of spontaneous circulation is mandatory, as deviations from the recommended temperature might result in side effects such as electrolyte imbalances or infections. However, previous methods are invasive and lack easy handling. A disposable, non-invasive temperature sensor using the heat flux approach (Double Sensor), was tested against the standard method: an esophagus thermometer.Methods: The sensor was placed on the forehead of adult patients (n = 25, M/F, median age 61 years) with return of spontaneous circulation after cardiac arrest undergoing targeted temperature management. The recorded temperatures were compared to the established measurement method of an esophageal thermometer. A paired t-test was performed to examine differences between methods. A Bland-Altman-Plot and the intraclass correlation coefficient were used to assess agreement and reliability. To rule out possible influence on measurements, the patients' medication was recorded as well.Results: Over the span of 1 year and 3 months, data from 25 patients were recorded. The t-test showed no significant difference between the two measuring methods (t = 1.47, p = 0.14, n = 1,319). Bland-Altman results showed a mean bias of 0.02 degrees C (95% confidence interval 0.00-0.04) and 95% limits of agreement of -1.023 degrees C and 1.066 degrees C. The intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.94. No skin irritation or allergic reaction was observed where the sensor was placed. In six patients the bias differed noticeably from the rest of the participants, but no sex-based or ethnicity-based differences could be identified. Influences on the measurements of the Double Sensor by drugs administered could also be ruled out.Conclusions: This study could demonstrate that measuring the core body temperature with the non-invasive, disposable sensor shows excellent reliability during targeted temperature management after survived cardiac arrest. Nonetheless, clinical research concerning the implementation of the sensor in other fields of application should be supported, as well as verifying our results by a larger patient cohort to possibly improve the limits of agreement.
core body temperature; return of spontaneous circulation; targeted temperature management; cardiac arrest; hypothermia; intraclass correlation coefficient; heat-flux sensor
Settore BIO/09 - Fisiologia
Settore MED/41 - Anestesiologia
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2434/845982
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