Boron (B) excess frequently impair plant performances and their productivity; in particular in arid and semi‐arid environments. In the present experiment; hydroponically‐grown ‘Granny Smith’ apple plants grafted on M9 rootstock were treated with optimal (25 μΜ) or excess (400 μΜ) B for 116 days to evaluate allometric responses of plants to B toxicity and to highlight physiological (photosynthesis and chlorophyll fluorescence) and biochemical (pigment content and sugar metabolism) responses of apple plants to B excess. Boron accumulated principally in top > middle > basal stems and leaves of high‐B‐stressed plants. Notably, the stem dramatically accumulated a higher level of B, as an attempt to preserve leaves, especially the youngest from further B accumulation. B accumulation seriously affected photosynthesis of younger leaves and caused both stomata (reduced stomatal conductance) and biochemical (reduction of apparent CO2 use efficiency and pigment content) limitations and altered the photochemistry and energy partitioning in photosystem II. Boron excess altered leaf sugar proportion; increasing the accumulation of non‐translocating sugars such as glucose and fructose. Our dataset adds knowledge on the effect of B excess in apple tree and poses serious concerns about the possible effect of B in altering sugar metabolism; which, in turn, can strongly affect fruit production of this worldwide‐cropped species.

Boron excess imbalances root/shoot allometry, photosynthetic and chlorophyll fluorescence parameters and sugar metabolism in apple plants / A. Oikonomou, E.V. Ladikou, G. Chatziperou, T. Margaritopoulou, M. Landi, T. Sotiropoulos, F. Araniti, I.E. Papadakis. - In: AGRONOMY. - ISSN 2073-4395. - 9:11(2019), pp. 731.1-731.17.

Boron excess imbalances root/shoot allometry, photosynthetic and chlorophyll fluorescence parameters and sugar metabolism in apple plants

F. Araniti;
2019

Abstract

Boron (B) excess frequently impair plant performances and their productivity; in particular in arid and semi‐arid environments. In the present experiment; hydroponically‐grown ‘Granny Smith’ apple plants grafted on M9 rootstock were treated with optimal (25 μΜ) or excess (400 μΜ) B for 116 days to evaluate allometric responses of plants to B toxicity and to highlight physiological (photosynthesis and chlorophyll fluorescence) and biochemical (pigment content and sugar metabolism) responses of apple plants to B excess. Boron accumulated principally in top > middle > basal stems and leaves of high‐B‐stressed plants. Notably, the stem dramatically accumulated a higher level of B, as an attempt to preserve leaves, especially the youngest from further B accumulation. B accumulation seriously affected photosynthesis of younger leaves and caused both stomata (reduced stomatal conductance) and biochemical (reduction of apparent CO2 use efficiency and pigment content) limitations and altered the photochemistry and energy partitioning in photosystem II. Boron excess altered leaf sugar proportion; increasing the accumulation of non‐translocating sugars such as glucose and fructose. Our dataset adds knowledge on the effect of B excess in apple tree and poses serious concerns about the possible effect of B in altering sugar metabolism; which, in turn, can strongly affect fruit production of this worldwide‐cropped species.
Boron excess; Boron partitioning; Chlorophyll fluorescence; Gas exchange; Polyol‐producing species; Rootstock; Sugar metabolism
Settore AGR/13 - Chimica Agraria
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2434/843145
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