Obesity is a chronic, complex pathology associated with a risk of developing secondary pathologies, including cardiovascular diseases, cancer, type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and musculoskeletal disorders. Since skeletal muscle accounts for more than 70% of total glucose disposal, metabolic alterations are strictly associated with the onset of insulin resistance and T2DM. The present study relies on the proteomic analysis of gastrocnemius muscle from 15 male and 15 female C56BL/J mice fed for 14 weeks with standard, 45% or 60% high-fat diets (HFD) adopting a label-free LC-MS/MS approach followed by bioinformatic pathway analysis. Results indicate changes in males due to HFD, with increased muscular stiffness (Col1a1, Col1a2, Actb), fiber-type switch from slow/oxidative to fast/glycolytic (decreased Myh7, Myl2, Myl3 and increased Myh2, Mylpf, Mybpc2, Myl1), increased oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction (decreased respiratory chain complex I and V and increased complex III subunits). At variance, females show few alterations and activation of compensatory mechanisms to counteract the increase of fatty acids. Bioinformatics analysis allows identifying upstream molecules involved in regulating pathways identified at variance in our analysis (Ppargc1a, Pparg, Cpt1b, Clpp, Tp53, Kdm5a, Hif1a). These findings underline the presence of a gender-specific response to be considered when approaching obesity and related comorbidities.

Skeletal Muscle Proteomic Profile Revealed Gender-Related Metabolic Responses in a Diet-Induced Obesity Animal Model / M. Moriggi, S. Belloli, P. Barbacini, V. Murtaj, E. Torretta, L. Chaabane, T. Canu, S. Penati, M.L. Malosio, A. Esposito, C. Gelfi, R.M. Moresco, D. Capitanio. - In: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MOLECULAR SCIENCES. - ISSN 1422-0067. - 22:9(2021 Apr 28), pp. 4680.1-4680.24. [10.3390/ijms22094680]

Skeletal Muscle Proteomic Profile Revealed Gender-Related Metabolic Responses in a Diet-Induced Obesity Animal Model

M. Moriggi
Primo
;
P. Barbacini;E. Torretta;C. Gelfi;D. Capitanio
Ultimo
2021

Abstract

Obesity is a chronic, complex pathology associated with a risk of developing secondary pathologies, including cardiovascular diseases, cancer, type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and musculoskeletal disorders. Since skeletal muscle accounts for more than 70% of total glucose disposal, metabolic alterations are strictly associated with the onset of insulin resistance and T2DM. The present study relies on the proteomic analysis of gastrocnemius muscle from 15 male and 15 female C56BL/J mice fed for 14 weeks with standard, 45% or 60% high-fat diets (HFD) adopting a label-free LC-MS/MS approach followed by bioinformatic pathway analysis. Results indicate changes in males due to HFD, with increased muscular stiffness (Col1a1, Col1a2, Actb), fiber-type switch from slow/oxidative to fast/glycolytic (decreased Myh7, Myl2, Myl3 and increased Myh2, Mylpf, Mybpc2, Myl1), increased oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction (decreased respiratory chain complex I and V and increased complex III subunits). At variance, females show few alterations and activation of compensatory mechanisms to counteract the increase of fatty acids. Bioinformatics analysis allows identifying upstream molecules involved in regulating pathways identified at variance in our analysis (Ppargc1a, Pparg, Cpt1b, Clpp, Tp53, Kdm5a, Hif1a). These findings underline the presence of a gender-specific response to be considered when approaching obesity and related comorbidities.
insulin resistance; obesity; proteomics; sarcopenia; skeletal muscle
Settore BIO/12 - Biochimica Clinica e Biologia Molecolare Clinica
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2434/841082
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