Objective: To identify the minimal clinically important difference (MCID) to define clinically meaningful patient's improvement on the Berg Balance Scale (BBS) in people with multiple sclerosis (PwMS) in response to rehabilitation. Design: Cohort study. Setting: Neurorehabilitation institute. Participants: PwMS (N=110). Interventions: This study comprised inpatients and outpatients who participated in research on balance and gait rehabilitation. All received 20 rehabilitation sessions with different intensities. Inpatients received daily treatments over a period of 4 weeks, while outpatients received 2 to 3 treatments per week for 10 weeks. Main Outcome Measures: An anchor-based approach using clinical global impression of improvement in balance (Activities-specific Balance Confidence [ABC] Scale) was used to determine the MCID of the BBS. The MCID was defined as the minimum change in the BBS total score (postintervention - preintervention) that was needed to perceive at least a 10% improvement on the ABC Scale. Receiver operating characteristic curves were used to define the cutoff of the optimal MCID of the BBS discriminating between improved and not improved subjects. Results: The MCID for change on the BBS was 3 points for the whole sample, 3 points for the inpatients, and 2 points for the outpatients. The area under the curve was .65 for the whole sample, .64 for inpatients, and .68 for outpatients. Conclusions: The MCID for improvement in balance as measured by the BBS was 3 points, meaning that PwMS are likely to perceive that as a reproducible and clinically important change in their balance performance.

Minimal Clinically Important Difference of Berg Balance Scale in People With Multiple Sclerosis / E. Gervasoni, J. Jonsdottir, A. Montesano, D. Cattaneo. - In: ARCHIVES OF PHYSICAL MEDICINE AND REHABILITATION. - ISSN 1532-821X. - 98:2(2017), pp. 337-340.

Minimal Clinically Important Difference of Berg Balance Scale in People With Multiple Sclerosis

D. Cattaneo
Ultimo
2017

Abstract

Objective: To identify the minimal clinically important difference (MCID) to define clinically meaningful patient's improvement on the Berg Balance Scale (BBS) in people with multiple sclerosis (PwMS) in response to rehabilitation. Design: Cohort study. Setting: Neurorehabilitation institute. Participants: PwMS (N=110). Interventions: This study comprised inpatients and outpatients who participated in research on balance and gait rehabilitation. All received 20 rehabilitation sessions with different intensities. Inpatients received daily treatments over a period of 4 weeks, while outpatients received 2 to 3 treatments per week for 10 weeks. Main Outcome Measures: An anchor-based approach using clinical global impression of improvement in balance (Activities-specific Balance Confidence [ABC] Scale) was used to determine the MCID of the BBS. The MCID was defined as the minimum change in the BBS total score (postintervention - preintervention) that was needed to perceive at least a 10% improvement on the ABC Scale. Receiver operating characteristic curves were used to define the cutoff of the optimal MCID of the BBS discriminating between improved and not improved subjects. Results: The MCID for change on the BBS was 3 points for the whole sample, 3 points for the inpatients, and 2 points for the outpatients. The area under the curve was .65 for the whole sample, .64 for inpatients, and .68 for outpatients. Conclusions: The MCID for improvement in balance as measured by the BBS was 3 points, meaning that PwMS are likely to perceive that as a reproducible and clinically important change in their balance performance.
Multiple sclerosis; Patient outcome assessment; Postural balance; Rehabilitation
Settore MED/48 -Scienze Infermie.e Tecniche Neuro-Psichiatriche e Riabilitattive
24-ott-2016
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2434/841059
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