Cryostimulation is currently seen as a potential adjuvant strategy to tackle obesity and dysmetabolism by triggering cold-induced thermogenesis. Although suggestive, the underlying mechanisms are still poorly elucidated. We tested whether single or repeated applications of partial- body cryostimulation (PBC) could influence resting energy expenditure (REE) in exposed individuals. Fifteen middle-aged obese and sixteen control lean women (body mass index 31 ± 1.6 kg/m2 and 22 ± 1.7 kg/m2) underwent a daily PBC (130 C ⇥ 150 s) for five consecutive days. Resting energy metabolism (REE) was assessed by indirect calorimetry pre- and post-PBC on day 1 and day 5. As concerns REE, the linear mixed model revealed that REE changes were explained by session and time (F1,29 = 5.58; p = 0.02; ⌘p2 = 0.16) independent of the group (F1,29 = 2.9; p = 0.09; ⌘p2 = 0.09). REE pre-PBC increased from day 1 to day 5 either in leans (by 8.2%, from 1538 ± 111 to 1665 ± 106 kcal/day) or in obese women (by 5.5%, from 1610 ± 110 to 1698 ± 142 vs kcal/day). Respiratory quotient was significantly affected by the time (F1,29 = 51.61; p < 0.000001, ⌘p2 = 0.64), as it increased from pre- to post-PBC, suggesting a shift in substrate oxidation. According to these preliminary data, cold-induced thermogenesis could be explored as a strategy to elevate REE in obese subjects. Longitudinal studies could test whether chronic PBC effects may entail favorable metabolic adaptations.

Partial-Body Cryostimulation Increases Resting Energy Expenditure in Lean and Obese Women / M. De Nardi, A. Bisio, L. Della Guardia, C. Facheris, E. Faelli, A. La Torre, L. Luzi, P. Ruggeri, R. Codella. - In: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH AND PUBLIC HEALTH. - ISSN 1660-4601. - 18:8(2021 Apr 14), pp. 4127.1-4127.11.

Partial-Body Cryostimulation Increases Resting Energy Expenditure in Lean and Obese Women

L. Della Guardia;A. La Torre;L. Luzi;R. Codella
2021-04-14

Abstract

Cryostimulation is currently seen as a potential adjuvant strategy to tackle obesity and dysmetabolism by triggering cold-induced thermogenesis. Although suggestive, the underlying mechanisms are still poorly elucidated. We tested whether single or repeated applications of partial- body cryostimulation (PBC) could influence resting energy expenditure (REE) in exposed individuals. Fifteen middle-aged obese and sixteen control lean women (body mass index 31 ± 1.6 kg/m2 and 22 ± 1.7 kg/m2) underwent a daily PBC (130 C ⇥ 150 s) for five consecutive days. Resting energy metabolism (REE) was assessed by indirect calorimetry pre- and post-PBC on day 1 and day 5. As concerns REE, the linear mixed model revealed that REE changes were explained by session and time (F1,29 = 5.58; p = 0.02; ⌘p2 = 0.16) independent of the group (F1,29 = 2.9; p = 0.09; ⌘p2 = 0.09). REE pre-PBC increased from day 1 to day 5 either in leans (by 8.2%, from 1538 ± 111 to 1665 ± 106 kcal/day) or in obese women (by 5.5%, from 1610 ± 110 to 1698 ± 142 vs kcal/day). Respiratory quotient was significantly affected by the time (F1,29 = 51.61; p < 0.000001, ⌘p2 = 0.64), as it increased from pre- to post-PBC, suggesting a shift in substrate oxidation. According to these preliminary data, cold-induced thermogenesis could be explored as a strategy to elevate REE in obese subjects. Longitudinal studies could test whether chronic PBC effects may entail favorable metabolic adaptations.
cold therapy; white adipose tissue; metabolism; thermogenesis; weight loss; adipocytes; indirect calorimetry; skeletal muscle; obesity treatment; brown adipose tissue
Settore M-EDF/02 - Metodi e Didattiche delle Attivita' Sportive
Settore MED/13 - Endocrinologia
Settore MED/50 - Scienze Tecniche Mediche Applicate
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2434/837872
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