In 1988 the RNA virus responsible for the majority of cases of parenteral non A, non B hepatitis (NANBH) was isolated and designated Hepatitis C Virus (HCV). Since then, the sequence of the genome of the virus has been defined and at least 10 different types identified. Clinical studies indicate that the majority of patients who acquire HCV develop chronic hepatic disease, in particular chronic active hepatitis or cirrhosis and some of them will develop hepatocellular carcinoma. Currently, there is no effective anti-HCV therapy and no passive or active immunization protocol for HCV. Epidemiological studies indicate that HCV infection is relatively well confined to specific patient populations, in particular injecting drug users and recipients of blood and blood products. Nevertheless as HCV infection is transmitted mainly parenterally it must be regarded as a potential hazard for dental health care staff. This article reviews current knowledge concerning HCV infection with particular attention to those issues relevant to the dentists in Italy including the dental management of the HCV infected patient and the risk of HCV cross-infection in the dental environment.

Epatite C ed odontoiatria : Rassegna della letteratura / L. Lodi, S.R. Porter, A. Sardella, A. Carrassi. - In: MINERVA STOMATOLOGICA. - ISSN 0026-4970. - 45:6(1996), pp. 253-258.

Epatite C ed odontoiatria : Rassegna della letteratura

L. Lodi;A. Sardella;A. Carrassi
1996

Abstract

In 1988 the RNA virus responsible for the majority of cases of parenteral non A, non B hepatitis (NANBH) was isolated and designated Hepatitis C Virus (HCV). Since then, the sequence of the genome of the virus has been defined and at least 10 different types identified. Clinical studies indicate that the majority of patients who acquire HCV develop chronic hepatic disease, in particular chronic active hepatitis or cirrhosis and some of them will develop hepatocellular carcinoma. Currently, there is no effective anti-HCV therapy and no passive or active immunization protocol for HCV. Epidemiological studies indicate that HCV infection is relatively well confined to specific patient populations, in particular injecting drug users and recipients of blood and blood products. Nevertheless as HCV infection is transmitted mainly parenterally it must be regarded as a potential hazard for dental health care staff. This article reviews current knowledge concerning HCV infection with particular attention to those issues relevant to the dentists in Italy including the dental management of the HCV infected patient and the risk of HCV cross-infection in the dental environment.
Settore MED/28 - Malattie Odontostomatologiche
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2434/830777
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