In recent decades, scholars have been increasingly interested in analysing immigrants' religiosity in Europe. In this article, we provide evidence about how the patterns of religious transmission are shaped by religious characteristics of both the origin and receiving contexts. We do so by focusing on Italy, which is both an almost homogeneously Catholic country and a fairly recent immigration destination, and by analysing three different dimensions of religiosity: service attendance, prayer and importance of religion. By relying on the "Social conditions and integration of foreign citizens" survey (ISTAT, 2011-2012), we fill an important theoretical and geographical gap by analysing differences in religiosity between parents and children. We claim that immigrant groups who share many characteristics with the natives tend to assimilate by adopting the same patterns of transmission (for example, Romanians in Italy). In contrast, immigrants who come from very different religious contexts, such as the Muslim Moroccan group, strongly react to this diversity by emphasising the transmission of their own religiosity. If, instead, immigrants come from a very secular country, such as Albania, they also tend to replicate this feature in the receiving countries, thus progressively weakening their religiosity and also their denominational differences. Overall, it is the interplay between origin and destination context which matters the most in shaping the patterns of religious transmission.

Immigrants’ Religious Transmission in Southern Europe: Reaction or Assimilation? Evidence from Italy / F. Molteni, I. Dimitriadis. - In: JOURNAL OF INTERNATIONAL MIGRATION AND INTEGRATION. - ISSN 1488-3473. - (2021). [Epub ahead of print] [10.1007/s12134-021-00815-3]

Immigrants’ Religious Transmission in Southern Europe: Reaction or Assimilation? Evidence from Italy

F. Molteni
Primo
;
I. Dimitriadis
Ultimo
2021

Abstract

In recent decades, scholars have been increasingly interested in analysing immigrants' religiosity in Europe. In this article, we provide evidence about how the patterns of religious transmission are shaped by religious characteristics of both the origin and receiving contexts. We do so by focusing on Italy, which is both an almost homogeneously Catholic country and a fairly recent immigration destination, and by analysing three different dimensions of religiosity: service attendance, prayer and importance of religion. By relying on the "Social conditions and integration of foreign citizens" survey (ISTAT, 2011-2012), we fill an important theoretical and geographical gap by analysing differences in religiosity between parents and children. We claim that immigrant groups who share many characteristics with the natives tend to assimilate by adopting the same patterns of transmission (for example, Romanians in Italy). In contrast, immigrants who come from very different religious contexts, such as the Muslim Moroccan group, strongly react to this diversity by emphasising the transmission of their own religiosity. If, instead, immigrants come from a very secular country, such as Albania, they also tend to replicate this feature in the receiving countries, thus progressively weakening their religiosity and also their denominational differences. Overall, it is the interplay between origin and destination context which matters the most in shaping the patterns of religious transmission.
Immigration; Religiosity; Religious transmission; Italy; Assimilation; Reaction;
Settore SPS/07 - Sociologia Generale
Settore SPS/09 - Sociologia dei Processi economici e del Lavoro
23-mar-2021
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2434/829377
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