The evolution through time and space of carbonate platforms and reefs is controlled by the interplay of global (climate, eustasy), regional (tectonic) and local environmental (nutrient levels, light penetration) factors affecting changes in accommodation and in the nature of the carbonate factories. Major tectonic plate reorganizations related to the opening of the Alpine Tethys and climatic fluctuations affected Jurassic carbonate successions, which recorded one of the major peaks in the Phanerozoic for the abundance of coral, sponge and microbialite reefs. This study focuses on the eastern Sardinia well-exposed Middle-Upper Jurassic carbonate depositional system that evolved in time and space in terms of facies composition and architecture, characters of the carbonate factory and geometry of the depositional profile encompassing four depositional phases. Detailed facies and microfacies analyses, diagenetic and geochemical investigations and new biostratigraphic data and strontium isotope analyses allowed to better constrain the distinctive sedimentological characteristics and age of these depositional phases, building upon the lithostratigraphic framework published in previous studies on eastern Sardinia carbonate succession. Phase 1 (Callovian-middle Oxfordian) was characterized by the development of a coated-grain dominated carbonate ramp with inner ramp ooidal shoals and peloidal packstone in middle to outer ramp. Phase 2 (late Oxfordian-late Kimmeridgian) recorded the evolution of a reef-bearing carbonate ramp characterized by three types of build-ups laterally distributed along the depositional profile, reflecting water depth increase and the interplay of water energy and light penetration. Type 1 build-ups (45 m thick, 100 m wide) consisted of coral-stromatoporoid boundstone and coral-stromatoporoid rudstone-grainstone and colonized proximal middle ramp settings. Type 2 build-ups (1-2 m thick, 3-4 m wide) were lens-shaped build-ups made of coral-calcareous sponge-diceratid boundstone, including stromatoporoids and chaetetid sponges associated with bioclastic packstone-grainstone developed in deeper, distal middle ramp settings. Type 3 build-ups (1 m thick and few metres wide) consisted of calcareous and siliceous sponge-coral-microbialite boundstone associated with bioclastic packstone-grainstone colonizing distal middle to outer ramp settings. The evolution from phase 1 to phase 2 was related to the global expansion of coral, stromatoporoid, calcareous and siliceous sponge and microbialite reefs during the middle Oxfordian-late Kimmeridgian due to eustatic sea-level rise and climatic fluctuations. Phase 3 (late Kimmeridgian) followed a sea-level fall likely driven by regional extensional tectonics recorded by a subaerial exposure surface at the top of phase 2 likely due to fault block uplift. During phase 3 peritidal facies accumulated in the proximal inner platform setting, whereas coated grain dominated facies (ooids and oncoids) were deposited as reworked grains in the more distal middle ramp domains. Differently from previous studies, the age of phase 3 was assigned to late Kimmeridgian according to strontium isotope and biostratigraphic data based on the occurrence of the foraminifer Alveosepta jaccardi rather than to the Tithonian. The top of phase 3 is marked by another event of subaerial exposure, also recorded in coeval Tethyan depositional settings as a regional unconformity attributed to extensional tectonics. The beginning of phase 4 (Tithonian) is characterized by transgressive basinal deposits followed by the recovery of a reefal carbonate factory. Phase 4 recorded a change in depositional geometry from a carbonate ramp to a higher-relief platform with a slope (about 70 m high and 3-15º steep). Basinal deposits consisted of mudstone, wackestone and siltstone and lithoclastic breccia with resedimented clasts from shallower environments through debris-flow mechanisms. Bio-intraclastic grainstone, wackestone with Clypeina jurassica, wackestone to floatstone with oncoids and peloidal intraclastic packstone to grainstone were resedimented from inner platform depositional environments. Debris-flow breccias include also lithoclasts of boundstone facies representing Tithonian bioconstructions developed during phase 4, different from the upper Oxfordian-upper Kimmeridgian phase 2 build-up types. Coral-calcareous sponge-microbialite boundstone and Bacinella boundstone constituted build-ups in well-illuminated shallow-water settings at the margin of phase 4 platform. Calcareous sponge-Crescentiella-coral boundstone and calcareous and siliceous sponge boundstone formed build-ups in the deeper upper slope and were resedimented into the adjacent basinal setting. The transgression and recovery of the reefal carbonate factory at the beginning of phase 4 were dated to the early Tithonian due to ammonite biostratigraphic data from the basinal deposits. These depositional events were coeval and possibly triggered by tectonic instability during the eustatic sea-level rise that promoted optimal conditions for reef growth during phase 4. The evolution of eastern Sardinia Callovian-Tithonian carbonate succession was controlled by global changes in the dominant carbonate factory with the onset of reef-building biota (late Oxfordian), regional extensional tectonics affecting the European margin of the Alpine Tethys that controlled relative sea-level changes and accommodation (late Kimmeridgian) and global eustatic rises in sea-level (late Oxfordian and early Tithonian). Petrographic, cathodoluminescence and carbon and oxygen stable isotope analyses allowed reconstructing the diagenetic evolution of each depositional phase. Phase 1 facies were characterized by replacive burial dolomitization of zoned luminescent dolomite close to the Hercynian basement and precipitation of blocky calcite cement and microsparite in burial environment and during meteoric telogenesis. Phase 2 facies were characterized by isopachous fibrous cement during early marine diagenesis, burial dolomitization and precipitation of equant blocky calcite and microsparite cement in burial and meteoric telogenetic diagenetic environments. Facies deposited during phase 3 were affected by early marine isopachous fibrous cement (middle ramp facies) or early meteoric vadose cementation by micritic meniscus and pendant cement (inner platform facies). The upper part of phase 3 succession, close to the subaerial exposure surface at the top, is characterized by fabric replacive dolomitization due to evaporitic brines in supratidal settings as inferred from the carbon and oxygen stable isotope signature. Precipitation of equant blocky calcite, fine-grained equant calcite and microsparite took place during burial diagenesis and telogenesis. Phase 4 facies are characterized by early marine (isopachous fibrous cement) and meteoric vadose (micritic meniscus) cementation. Fabric replacive dolomitization took place in the lower part of phase 4 facies close to the subaerial exposure surface due to possibly evaporitic brines. Blocky calcite cement and microsparite precipitated in burial environment and during meteoric telogenesis. This study, integrating field data, petrographic, biostratigraphic, diagenetic and geochemical stable isotope analyses, highlights how regional tectonics, eustasy and carbonate factory changes affected the evolution of a Jurassic carbonate depositional system and reef growth. These findings have implications for the understanding of the responses of carbonate platforms and reef-building biota to environmental, climate and accommodation changes in the geological record.

L’evoluzione temporale e spaziale delle piattaforme carbonatiche e delle biocostruzioni è controllata dall’interazione di fattori globali (clima, variazioni eustatiche), regionali (tettonica) e fattori ambientali locali (nutrienti, penetrazione della luce e profondità) che influiscono sulle variazioni dell’accomodamento e la natura delle carbonate factories. La riorganizzazione delle placche tettoniche legata all’apertura della Tetide Alpina e le variazioni climatiche hanno influenzato direttamente le successioni carbonatiche Giurassiche, le quali registrano uno dei maggiori momenti di abbondanza e distribuzione di reef a coralli, spugne e microbialiti. Questo studio si focalizza sulla successione carbonatica del Giurassico Medio-Superiore della Sardegna orientale e la sua evoluzione nello spazio e nel tempo in termini di composizione e architettura delle facies, caratteristiche della carbonate factory e geometria del profilo deposizionale attraverso quattro fasi deposizionali. Le caratteristiche sedimentologiche e l’età di queste fasi deposizionali sono state approfondite attraverso dettagliate analisi di facies e microfacies, analisi geochimiche, diagenetiche e degli isotopi dello stronzio, nuovi dati biostratigrafici e precedenti studi litostratigrafici. La fase 1 (Calloviano-Oxfordiano medio) è caratterizzata da una rampa carbonatica dominata da grani rivestiti costituita da shoals a ooidi nella rampa interna e packstone peloidali nella rampa media e esterna. La fase 2 (Oxfordiano superiore-Kimmeridgiano superiore) registra l’evoluzione di una rampa carbonatica caratterizzata dalla presenza di tre tipi di biocostruzioni distribuite lateralmente lungo il profilo batimetrico, le cui caratteristiche sono controllate dall’interazione tra energia idrodinamica dell’ambiente e penetrazione della luce. Le biocostruzioni di tipo 1 (spessore 45 m, larghezza 100 m) sono costituite da boundstone e rudstone-grainstone a coralli e stromatoporoidi e colonizzano la rampa media prossimale. Le biocostruzioni di tipo 2 (spessore: 1-2 m, larghezza: 3-4 m) consistono di corpi lenticolari costituiti da boundstone a coralli, spugne calcaree e bivalvi diceratidi (compresi stromatoporoidi e spugne chetetidi) associati a packstone-grainstone bioclastici ed occupavano la rampa media distale. Le biocostruzioni di tipo 3 (1 m di spessore e pochi metri di larghezza) sono costituite da boundstone a spugne calcaree e silicee e coralli associati a packstone-grainstone bioclastici ed occupavano la rampa media distale e la rampa esterna. L’evoluzione dalla fase 1 alla fase 2 è legata all’espansione globale dei reef a coralli, stromatoporoidi, spugne calcaree e silicee e microbialiti durante il periodo Oxfordiano medio-Kimmeridgiano superiore dovuto ad una risalita eustatica e a variazioni climatiche. La fase 3 (Kimmeridgiano superiore) è successiva ad un abbassamento relativo del livello marino probabilmente dovuta a tettonica estensionale testimoniata da una superficie di esposizione subaerea al di sopra della fase 2. Durante la fase 3 nella rampa interna prossimale si sono depositate facies peritidali, mentre la rampa media distale è dominata da facies con grani rivestiti rimaneggiati (ooidi e oncoidi). L’età della fase 3 è stata revisionata rispetto ai lavori precedenti e assegnata al Kimmeridgiano superiore sulla base delle analisi sugli isotopi dello stronzio e nuovi dati biostratigrafici, in particolare in base alla presenza del foraminifero bentonico Alveosepta jaccardi. Il tetto della fase 3 è caratterizzato da un altro evento di esposizione subaerea registrato anche in coevi sistemi deposizionali Tetidei con una unconformity regionale attribuita a tettonica estensionale. L’inizio della fase 4 (Titoniano) è caratterizzato da depositi bacinali trasgressivi seguiti dalla ripresa della carbonate factory di reef. Questa fase è caratterizzata da un cambiamento della geometria deposizionale da rampa carbonatica a piattaforma ad alto rilievo con uno slope alto circa 70 m e inclinato di 3-15°. I depositi bacinali della fase 4 sono costituiti da mudstone, wackestone e siltstone e brecce litoclastiche con clasti risedimentati da meccanismi di debris flow e provenienti da ambienti meno profondi. Grainstone bio-intraclastici, wackestone con Clypeina jurassica, wackestone e floatstone con oncoidi e packstone/grainstone peloidali sono risedimentati da ambienti di piattaforma interna. Le brecce di debris-flow includono anche clasti provenienti da biocostruzioni Titoniane sviluppate durante la fase 4, differenti dalle biocostruzioni Oxfordiano-Kimmeridgiane della fase 2. Boundstone a coralli, spugne calcaree e microbialiti e boundstone a Bacinella irregularis costituivano biocostruzioni in ambienti ben illuminati di bassa profondità al margine della piattaforma della fase 4, mentre biocostruzioni nella parte superiore dello slope erano costituite da boundstone a spugne calcaree, Crescentiella morronensis e coralli e boundstone a spugne silicee. La trasgressione e la ripresa della carbonate factory di reef all’inizio della fase 4 sono state attribuite al Titoniano inferiore in accordo con nuovi dati biostratigrafici grazie al ritrovamento di ammoniti nelle facies bacinali. Questi eventi deposizionali sono stati probabilmente innescati da contemporanea instabilità tettonica e innalzamento eustatico che hanno favorito l’instaurarsi di condizioni ottimali per lo sviluppo dei reef della fase 4. I principali fattori di controllo dell’evoluzione della successione carbonatica Calloviano-Titoniano della Sardegna orientale sono: i cambiamenti globali delle carbonate factories con lo sviluppo di biota di reef (Oxfordiano superiore), la tettonica estensionale regionale registrata sul margine Europeo della Tetide Alpina che ha influenzato cambiamenti relativi del livello marino e accomodamento (Kimmeridgiano superiore) e innalzamenti globali del livello marino (Oxfordiano superiore e Titoniano inferiore). L’evoluzione diagenetica per ogni fase deposizionale è stata ricostruita tramite analisi petrografiche, in catodoluminescenza e analisi degli isotopi stabili di carbonio e ossigeno. Le facies della fase 1 sono caratterizzate da dolomitizzazione avvenuta durante la diagenesi di seppellimento, costituita da dolomite luminescente zonata formatasi nella porzione inferiore della successione nei pressi del basamento Ercinico e da cemento calcitico blocky e microsparite precipitati in ambiente di seppellimento o durante la telogenesi meteorica. Le facies deposte durante la fase 2 sono caratterizzate da cemento fibroso isopaco precipitato durante la diagenesi marina precoce, dolomitizzazione di seppellimento e cemento calcitico blocky e microsparite precipitati in ambiente di seppellimento o durante la telogenesi meteorica. Le facies della fase 3 sono caratterizzate da cementazione marina precoce da parte di cemento fibroso isopaco nelle facies di rampa media e da cementazione meteorica vadosa precoce da parte di cemento micritico a menisco e pendant nelle facies di piattaforma interna. La parte superiore delle facies della fase 3, nei pressi della superficie di esposizione subaerea, è caratterizzata da dolomitizzazione dovuta a brine evaporitiche in ambiente supratidale come dimostrato dalle caratteristiche petrografiche e dalla composizione isotopica di carbonio e ossigeno. Cemento calcitico blocky, cemento equigranulare a grana fine e microsparite precipitati in ambiente di seppellimento o di telogenesi meteorica caratterizzano le facies di fase 3. Le facies deposte durante la fase 4 sono caratterizzate da cementazione precoce marina con cemento fibroso isopaco e meteorica vadosa con cemento micritico a menisco. Anche le facies di fase 4 sono dolomitizzate per via dell’effetto di brine evaporitiche nei pressi della superficie di esposizione subaerea. Inoltre sono caratterizzate da cemento blocky e microsparite precipitate in ambiente di seppellimento e durante la telogenesi meteorica. Questo studio mette in luce come la tettonica globale e regionale, l’eustatismo e i cambiamenti delle carbonate factories influenzano l’evoluzione dei sistemi deposizionali carbonatici e lo sviluppo dei reefs durante il Giurassico integrando dati di terreno, petrografici, biostratigrafici, diagenetici e geochimici. I risultati hanno implicazioni nella comprensione di come le piattaforme carbonatiche e gli organismi costruttori di reef rispondono ai cambiamenti ambientali, climatici e di accomodamento nel record geologico.

CONTROLLING FACTORS ON THE DEPOSITIONAL ARCHITECTURE OF CARBONATE SYSTEMS: SEDIMENTOLOGY, FACIES, GEOMETRY, DIAGENESIS AND GEOCHEMISTRY OF EASTERN SARDINIA JURASSIC CARBONATES / M. Nembrini ; tutor: G. Della Porta ; co-tutor: F. Berra ; coordinatore: F. Camara Artigas. - : . Università degli Studi di Milano, 2021 Mar 25. ((33. ciclo, Anno Accademico 2020. [10.13130/nembrini-mattia_phd2021-03-25].

CONTROLLING FACTORS ON THE DEPOSITIONAL ARCHITECTURE OF CARBONATE SYSTEMS: SEDIMENTOLOGY, FACIES, GEOMETRY, DIAGENESIS AND GEOCHEMISTRY OF EASTERN SARDINIA JURASSIC CARBONATES

M. Nembrini
2021

Abstract

L’evoluzione temporale e spaziale delle piattaforme carbonatiche e delle biocostruzioni è controllata dall’interazione di fattori globali (clima, variazioni eustatiche), regionali (tettonica) e fattori ambientali locali (nutrienti, penetrazione della luce e profondità) che influiscono sulle variazioni dell’accomodamento e la natura delle carbonate factories. La riorganizzazione delle placche tettoniche legata all’apertura della Tetide Alpina e le variazioni climatiche hanno influenzato direttamente le successioni carbonatiche Giurassiche, le quali registrano uno dei maggiori momenti di abbondanza e distribuzione di reef a coralli, spugne e microbialiti. Questo studio si focalizza sulla successione carbonatica del Giurassico Medio-Superiore della Sardegna orientale e la sua evoluzione nello spazio e nel tempo in termini di composizione e architettura delle facies, caratteristiche della carbonate factory e geometria del profilo deposizionale attraverso quattro fasi deposizionali. Le caratteristiche sedimentologiche e l’età di queste fasi deposizionali sono state approfondite attraverso dettagliate analisi di facies e microfacies, analisi geochimiche, diagenetiche e degli isotopi dello stronzio, nuovi dati biostratigrafici e precedenti studi litostratigrafici. La fase 1 (Calloviano-Oxfordiano medio) è caratterizzata da una rampa carbonatica dominata da grani rivestiti costituita da shoals a ooidi nella rampa interna e packstone peloidali nella rampa media e esterna. La fase 2 (Oxfordiano superiore-Kimmeridgiano superiore) registra l’evoluzione di una rampa carbonatica caratterizzata dalla presenza di tre tipi di biocostruzioni distribuite lateralmente lungo il profilo batimetrico, le cui caratteristiche sono controllate dall’interazione tra energia idrodinamica dell’ambiente e penetrazione della luce. Le biocostruzioni di tipo 1 (spessore 45 m, larghezza 100 m) sono costituite da boundstone e rudstone-grainstone a coralli e stromatoporoidi e colonizzano la rampa media prossimale. Le biocostruzioni di tipo 2 (spessore: 1-2 m, larghezza: 3-4 m) consistono di corpi lenticolari costituiti da boundstone a coralli, spugne calcaree e bivalvi diceratidi (compresi stromatoporoidi e spugne chetetidi) associati a packstone-grainstone bioclastici ed occupavano la rampa media distale. Le biocostruzioni di tipo 3 (1 m di spessore e pochi metri di larghezza) sono costituite da boundstone a spugne calcaree e silicee e coralli associati a packstone-grainstone bioclastici ed occupavano la rampa media distale e la rampa esterna. L’evoluzione dalla fase 1 alla fase 2 è legata all’espansione globale dei reef a coralli, stromatoporoidi, spugne calcaree e silicee e microbialiti durante il periodo Oxfordiano medio-Kimmeridgiano superiore dovuto ad una risalita eustatica e a variazioni climatiche. La fase 3 (Kimmeridgiano superiore) è successiva ad un abbassamento relativo del livello marino probabilmente dovuta a tettonica estensionale testimoniata da una superficie di esposizione subaerea al di sopra della fase 2. Durante la fase 3 nella rampa interna prossimale si sono depositate facies peritidali, mentre la rampa media distale è dominata da facies con grani rivestiti rimaneggiati (ooidi e oncoidi). L’età della fase 3 è stata revisionata rispetto ai lavori precedenti e assegnata al Kimmeridgiano superiore sulla base delle analisi sugli isotopi dello stronzio e nuovi dati biostratigrafici, in particolare in base alla presenza del foraminifero bentonico Alveosepta jaccardi. Il tetto della fase 3 è caratterizzato da un altro evento di esposizione subaerea registrato anche in coevi sistemi deposizionali Tetidei con una unconformity regionale attribuita a tettonica estensionale. L’inizio della fase 4 (Titoniano) è caratterizzato da depositi bacinali trasgressivi seguiti dalla ripresa della carbonate factory di reef. Questa fase è caratterizzata da un cambiamento della geometria deposizionale da rampa carbonatica a piattaforma ad alto rilievo con uno slope alto circa 70 m e inclinato di 3-15°. I depositi bacinali della fase 4 sono costituiti da mudstone, wackestone e siltstone e brecce litoclastiche con clasti risedimentati da meccanismi di debris flow e provenienti da ambienti meno profondi. Grainstone bio-intraclastici, wackestone con Clypeina jurassica, wackestone e floatstone con oncoidi e packstone/grainstone peloidali sono risedimentati da ambienti di piattaforma interna. Le brecce di debris-flow includono anche clasti provenienti da biocostruzioni Titoniane sviluppate durante la fase 4, differenti dalle biocostruzioni Oxfordiano-Kimmeridgiane della fase 2. Boundstone a coralli, spugne calcaree e microbialiti e boundstone a Bacinella irregularis costituivano biocostruzioni in ambienti ben illuminati di bassa profondità al margine della piattaforma della fase 4, mentre biocostruzioni nella parte superiore dello slope erano costituite da boundstone a spugne calcaree, Crescentiella morronensis e coralli e boundstone a spugne silicee. La trasgressione e la ripresa della carbonate factory di reef all’inizio della fase 4 sono state attribuite al Titoniano inferiore in accordo con nuovi dati biostratigrafici grazie al ritrovamento di ammoniti nelle facies bacinali. Questi eventi deposizionali sono stati probabilmente innescati da contemporanea instabilità tettonica e innalzamento eustatico che hanno favorito l’instaurarsi di condizioni ottimali per lo sviluppo dei reef della fase 4. I principali fattori di controllo dell’evoluzione della successione carbonatica Calloviano-Titoniano della Sardegna orientale sono: i cambiamenti globali delle carbonate factories con lo sviluppo di biota di reef (Oxfordiano superiore), la tettonica estensionale regionale registrata sul margine Europeo della Tetide Alpina che ha influenzato cambiamenti relativi del livello marino e accomodamento (Kimmeridgiano superiore) e innalzamenti globali del livello marino (Oxfordiano superiore e Titoniano inferiore). L’evoluzione diagenetica per ogni fase deposizionale è stata ricostruita tramite analisi petrografiche, in catodoluminescenza e analisi degli isotopi stabili di carbonio e ossigeno. Le facies della fase 1 sono caratterizzate da dolomitizzazione avvenuta durante la diagenesi di seppellimento, costituita da dolomite luminescente zonata formatasi nella porzione inferiore della successione nei pressi del basamento Ercinico e da cemento calcitico blocky e microsparite precipitati in ambiente di seppellimento o durante la telogenesi meteorica. Le facies deposte durante la fase 2 sono caratterizzate da cemento fibroso isopaco precipitato durante la diagenesi marina precoce, dolomitizzazione di seppellimento e cemento calcitico blocky e microsparite precipitati in ambiente di seppellimento o durante la telogenesi meteorica. Le facies della fase 3 sono caratterizzate da cementazione marina precoce da parte di cemento fibroso isopaco nelle facies di rampa media e da cementazione meteorica vadosa precoce da parte di cemento micritico a menisco e pendant nelle facies di piattaforma interna. La parte superiore delle facies della fase 3, nei pressi della superficie di esposizione subaerea, è caratterizzata da dolomitizzazione dovuta a brine evaporitiche in ambiente supratidale come dimostrato dalle caratteristiche petrografiche e dalla composizione isotopica di carbonio e ossigeno. Cemento calcitico blocky, cemento equigranulare a grana fine e microsparite precipitati in ambiente di seppellimento o di telogenesi meteorica caratterizzano le facies di fase 3. Le facies deposte durante la fase 4 sono caratterizzate da cementazione precoce marina con cemento fibroso isopaco e meteorica vadosa con cemento micritico a menisco. Anche le facies di fase 4 sono dolomitizzate per via dell’effetto di brine evaporitiche nei pressi della superficie di esposizione subaerea. Inoltre sono caratterizzate da cemento blocky e microsparite precipitate in ambiente di seppellimento e durante la telogenesi meteorica. Questo studio mette in luce come la tettonica globale e regionale, l’eustatismo e i cambiamenti delle carbonate factories influenzano l’evoluzione dei sistemi deposizionali carbonatici e lo sviluppo dei reefs durante il Giurassico integrando dati di terreno, petrografici, biostratigrafici, diagenetici e geochimici. I risultati hanno implicazioni nella comprensione di come le piattaforme carbonatiche e gli organismi costruttori di reef rispondono ai cambiamenti ambientali, climatici e di accomodamento nel record geologico.
DELLA PORTA, GIOVANNA
CAMARA ARTIGAS, FERNANDO
The evolution through time and space of carbonate platforms and reefs is controlled by the interplay of global (climate, eustasy), regional (tectonic) and local environmental (nutrient levels, light penetration) factors affecting changes in accommodation and in the nature of the carbonate factories. Major tectonic plate reorganizations related to the opening of the Alpine Tethys and climatic fluctuations affected Jurassic carbonate successions, which recorded one of the major peaks in the Phanerozoic for the abundance of coral, sponge and microbialite reefs. This study focuses on the eastern Sardinia well-exposed Middle-Upper Jurassic carbonate depositional system that evolved in time and space in terms of facies composition and architecture, characters of the carbonate factory and geometry of the depositional profile encompassing four depositional phases. Detailed facies and microfacies analyses, diagenetic and geochemical investigations and new biostratigraphic data and strontium isotope analyses allowed to better constrain the distinctive sedimentological characteristics and age of these depositional phases, building upon the lithostratigraphic framework published in previous studies on eastern Sardinia carbonate succession. Phase 1 (Callovian-middle Oxfordian) was characterized by the development of a coated-grain dominated carbonate ramp with inner ramp ooidal shoals and peloidal packstone in middle to outer ramp. Phase 2 (late Oxfordian-late Kimmeridgian) recorded the evolution of a reef-bearing carbonate ramp characterized by three types of build-ups laterally distributed along the depositional profile, reflecting water depth increase and the interplay of water energy and light penetration. Type 1 build-ups (45 m thick, 100 m wide) consisted of coral-stromatoporoid boundstone and coral-stromatoporoid rudstone-grainstone and colonized proximal middle ramp settings. Type 2 build-ups (1-2 m thick, 3-4 m wide) were lens-shaped build-ups made of coral-calcareous sponge-diceratid boundstone, including stromatoporoids and chaetetid sponges associated with bioclastic packstone-grainstone developed in deeper, distal middle ramp settings. Type 3 build-ups (1 m thick and few metres wide) consisted of calcareous and siliceous sponge-coral-microbialite boundstone associated with bioclastic packstone-grainstone colonizing distal middle to outer ramp settings. The evolution from phase 1 to phase 2 was related to the global expansion of coral, stromatoporoid, calcareous and siliceous sponge and microbialite reefs during the middle Oxfordian-late Kimmeridgian due to eustatic sea-level rise and climatic fluctuations. Phase 3 (late Kimmeridgian) followed a sea-level fall likely driven by regional extensional tectonics recorded by a subaerial exposure surface at the top of phase 2 likely due to fault block uplift. During phase 3 peritidal facies accumulated in the proximal inner platform setting, whereas coated grain dominated facies (ooids and oncoids) were deposited as reworked grains in the more distal middle ramp domains. Differently from previous studies, the age of phase 3 was assigned to late Kimmeridgian according to strontium isotope and biostratigraphic data based on the occurrence of the foraminifer Alveosepta jaccardi rather than to the Tithonian. The top of phase 3 is marked by another event of subaerial exposure, also recorded in coeval Tethyan depositional settings as a regional unconformity attributed to extensional tectonics. The beginning of phase 4 (Tithonian) is characterized by transgressive basinal deposits followed by the recovery of a reefal carbonate factory. Phase 4 recorded a change in depositional geometry from a carbonate ramp to a higher-relief platform with a slope (about 70 m high and 3-15º steep). Basinal deposits consisted of mudstone, wackestone and siltstone and lithoclastic breccia with resedimented clasts from shallower environments through debris-flow mechanisms. Bio-intraclastic grainstone, wackestone with Clypeina jurassica, wackestone to floatstone with oncoids and peloidal intraclastic packstone to grainstone were resedimented from inner platform depositional environments. Debris-flow breccias include also lithoclasts of boundstone facies representing Tithonian bioconstructions developed during phase 4, different from the upper Oxfordian-upper Kimmeridgian phase 2 build-up types. Coral-calcareous sponge-microbialite boundstone and Bacinella boundstone constituted build-ups in well-illuminated shallow-water settings at the margin of phase 4 platform. Calcareous sponge-Crescentiella-coral boundstone and calcareous and siliceous sponge boundstone formed build-ups in the deeper upper slope and were resedimented into the adjacent basinal setting. The transgression and recovery of the reefal carbonate factory at the beginning of phase 4 were dated to the early Tithonian due to ammonite biostratigraphic data from the basinal deposits. These depositional events were coeval and possibly triggered by tectonic instability during the eustatic sea-level rise that promoted optimal conditions for reef growth during phase 4. The evolution of eastern Sardinia Callovian-Tithonian carbonate succession was controlled by global changes in the dominant carbonate factory with the onset of reef-building biota (late Oxfordian), regional extensional tectonics affecting the European margin of the Alpine Tethys that controlled relative sea-level changes and accommodation (late Kimmeridgian) and global eustatic rises in sea-level (late Oxfordian and early Tithonian). Petrographic, cathodoluminescence and carbon and oxygen stable isotope analyses allowed reconstructing the diagenetic evolution of each depositional phase. Phase 1 facies were characterized by replacive burial dolomitization of zoned luminescent dolomite close to the Hercynian basement and precipitation of blocky calcite cement and microsparite in burial environment and during meteoric telogenesis. Phase 2 facies were characterized by isopachous fibrous cement during early marine diagenesis, burial dolomitization and precipitation of equant blocky calcite and microsparite cement in burial and meteoric telogenetic diagenetic environments. Facies deposited during phase 3 were affected by early marine isopachous fibrous cement (middle ramp facies) or early meteoric vadose cementation by micritic meniscus and pendant cement (inner platform facies). The upper part of phase 3 succession, close to the subaerial exposure surface at the top, is characterized by fabric replacive dolomitization due to evaporitic brines in supratidal settings as inferred from the carbon and oxygen stable isotope signature. Precipitation of equant blocky calcite, fine-grained equant calcite and microsparite took place during burial diagenesis and telogenesis. Phase 4 facies are characterized by early marine (isopachous fibrous cement) and meteoric vadose (micritic meniscus) cementation. Fabric replacive dolomitization took place in the lower part of phase 4 facies close to the subaerial exposure surface due to possibly evaporitic brines. Blocky calcite cement and microsparite precipitated in burial environment and during meteoric telogenesis. This study, integrating field data, petrographic, biostratigraphic, diagenetic and geochemical stable isotope analyses, highlights how regional tectonics, eustasy and carbonate factory changes affected the evolution of a Jurassic carbonate depositional system and reef growth. These findings have implications for the understanding of the responses of carbonate platforms and reef-building biota to environmental, climate and accommodation changes in the geological record.
Carbonate platform; Carbonate ramp; Reefs; Corals; Stromatoporoids; Sponges; Upper Jurassic; Sardinia
Settore GEO/02 - Geologia Stratigrafica e Sedimentologica
CONTROLLING FACTORS ON THE DEPOSITIONAL ARCHITECTURE OF CARBONATE SYSTEMS: SEDIMENTOLOGY, FACIES, GEOMETRY, DIAGENESIS AND GEOCHEMISTRY OF EASTERN SARDINIA JURASSIC CARBONATES / M. Nembrini ; tutor: G. Della Porta ; co-tutor: F. Berra ; coordinatore: F. Camara Artigas. - : . Università degli Studi di Milano, 2021 Mar 25. ((33. ciclo, Anno Accademico 2020. [10.13130/nembrini-mattia_phd2021-03-25].
Doctoral Thesis
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
phd_unimi_R11949.pdf

accesso aperto

Tipologia: Tesi di dottorato completa
Dimensione 10.3 MB
Formato Adobe PDF
10.3 MB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri
Pubblicazioni consigliate

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2434/829369
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus ND
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? ND
social impact