Adverse cognitive and behavioral conditions and psychiatric disorders are considered a critical and unmitigated risk during future long-duration space missions (LDSM). Monitoring and mitigating crew health and performance risks during these missions will require tools and technologies that allow to reliably assess cognitive performance and mental well-being. Electroencephalography (EEG) has the potential to meet the technical requirements for the non-invasive and objective monitoring of neurobehavioral conditions during LDSM. Weightlessness is associated with fluid and brain shifts, and these effects could potentially challenge the interpretation of resting state EEG recordings. Head-down tilt bed rest (HDBR) provides a unique spaceflight analog to study these effects on Earth. Here, we present data from two long-duration HDBR experiments, which were used to systematically investigate the time course of resting state electrocortical activity during prolonged HDBR. EEG spectral power significantly reduced within the delta, theta, alpha, and beta frequency bands. Likewise, EEG source localization revealed significantly lower activity in a broad range of centroparietal and occipital areas within the alpha and beta frequency domains. These changes were observed shortly after the onset of HDBR, did not change throughout HDBR, and returned to baseline after the cessation of bed rest. EEG resting state functional connectivity was not affected by HDBR. The results provide evidence for a postural effect on resting state brain activity that persists throughout long-duration HDBR, indicating that immobilization and inactivity per se do not affect resting state electrocortical activity during HDBR. Our findings raise an important issue on the validity of EEG to identify the time course of changes in brain function during prolonged HBDR, and highlight the importance to maintain a consistent body posture during all testing sessions, including data collections at baseline and recovery.

Head-Down Tilt Position, but Not the Duration of Bed Rest Affects Resting State Electrocortical Activity / K. Brauns, A. Friedl-Werner, M.A. Maggioni, H. Gunga, A.C. Stahn. - In: FRONTIERS IN PHYSIOLOGY. - ISSN 1664-042X. - 12(2021 Feb 24). [10.3389/fphys.2021.638669]

Head-Down Tilt Position, but Not the Duration of Bed Rest Affects Resting State Electrocortical Activity

M.A. Maggioni;
2021

Abstract

Adverse cognitive and behavioral conditions and psychiatric disorders are considered a critical and unmitigated risk during future long-duration space missions (LDSM). Monitoring and mitigating crew health and performance risks during these missions will require tools and technologies that allow to reliably assess cognitive performance and mental well-being. Electroencephalography (EEG) has the potential to meet the technical requirements for the non-invasive and objective monitoring of neurobehavioral conditions during LDSM. Weightlessness is associated with fluid and brain shifts, and these effects could potentially challenge the interpretation of resting state EEG recordings. Head-down tilt bed rest (HDBR) provides a unique spaceflight analog to study these effects on Earth. Here, we present data from two long-duration HDBR experiments, which were used to systematically investigate the time course of resting state electrocortical activity during prolonged HDBR. EEG spectral power significantly reduced within the delta, theta, alpha, and beta frequency bands. Likewise, EEG source localization revealed significantly lower activity in a broad range of centroparietal and occipital areas within the alpha and beta frequency domains. These changes were observed shortly after the onset of HDBR, did not change throughout HDBR, and returned to baseline after the cessation of bed rest. EEG resting state functional connectivity was not affected by HDBR. The results provide evidence for a postural effect on resting state brain activity that persists throughout long-duration HDBR, indicating that immobilization and inactivity per se do not affect resting state electrocortical activity during HDBR. Our findings raise an important issue on the validity of EEG to identify the time course of changes in brain function during prolonged HBDR, and highlight the importance to maintain a consistent body posture during all testing sessions, including data collections at baseline and recovery.
EEG; bed rest; brain; cognition; fluid shift; spaceflight
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2434/825697
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