In a well-known course he gave in 1904-1905, Edmund Husserl developed a 'threefold' notion of image revolving around the notion of depiction [Abbildung]. More specifically, the phenomenological description allows a seeing-in to emerge as an essential characteristic of the image consciousness, in which an image object assumes the role of a representant [Reprasentant] in order to allow us to see the image subject in the image itself (thanks to "moments of resemblance" shared by image object and image subject). Nevertheless, our paper - focusing particularly on what might be called the depictive art par excellence, that is the portrait - aims to show that it would be erroneous to read the Husserlian notion of image exclusively on the basis of this earlier course: things seem to change significantly when Husserl develops a different notion of phantasy, and artistic images, in particular, are not to be thought of as resembling something else, but rather as expressive images producing their own model.

In a well-known course he gave in 1904-1905, Edmund Husserl developed a ‘threefold’ notion of image revolving around the notion of depiction [Abbildung]. More specifically, the phenomenological description allows a seeing-in to emerge as an essential characteristic of the image consciousness, in which an image object assumes the role of a representant [Repräsentant] in order to allow us to see the image subject in the image itself (thanks to “moments of resemblance” shared by image object and image subject). Nevertheless, our paper – focusing particularly on what might be called the depictive art par excellence, that is the portrait – aims to show that it would be erroneous to read the Husserlian notion of image exclusively on the basis of this earlier course: things seem to change significantly when Husserl develops a different notion of phantasy, and artistic images, in particular, are not to be thought of as resembling something else, but rather as expressive images producing their own model.

From Abbild or Bild? Depiction and Resemblance in Husserl’s Phenomenology / C. Rozzoni. - In: AISTHESIS. - ISSN 2035-8466. - 10:1(2017), pp. 117-130. [10.13128/Aisthesis-20912]

From Abbild or Bild? Depiction and Resemblance in Husserl’s Phenomenology

C. Rozzoni
2017

Abstract

In a well-known course he gave in 1904-1905, Edmund Husserl developed a 'threefold' notion of image revolving around the notion of depiction [Abbildung]. More specifically, the phenomenological description allows a seeing-in to emerge as an essential characteristic of the image consciousness, in which an image object assumes the role of a representant [Reprasentant] in order to allow us to see the image subject in the image itself (thanks to "moments of resemblance" shared by image object and image subject). Nevertheless, our paper - focusing particularly on what might be called the depictive art par excellence, that is the portrait - aims to show that it would be erroneous to read the Husserlian notion of image exclusively on the basis of this earlier course: things seem to change significantly when Husserl develops a different notion of phantasy, and artistic images, in particular, are not to be thought of as resembling something else, but rather as expressive images producing their own model.
In a well-known course he gave in 1904-1905, Edmund Husserl developed a ‘threefold’ notion of image revolving around the notion of depiction [Abbildung]. More specifically, the phenomenological description allows a seeing-in to emerge as an essential characteristic of the image consciousness, in which an image object assumes the role of a representant [Repräsentant] in order to allow us to see the image subject in the image itself (thanks to “moments of resemblance” shared by image object and image subject). Nevertheless, our paper – focusing particularly on what might be called the depictive art par excellence, that is the portrait – aims to show that it would be erroneous to read the Husserlian notion of image exclusively on the basis of this earlier course: things seem to change significantly when Husserl develops a different notion of phantasy, and artistic images, in particular, are not to be thought of as resembling something else, but rather as expressive images producing their own model.
Image, Depiction, Expression, Portrait, Resemblance.
Settore M-FIL/04 - Estetica
Settore L-ART/06 - Cinema, Fotografia e Televisione
Settore M-FIL/01 - Filosofia Teoretica
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2434/825648
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