Background: Preterm birth affects almost 9–11% of newborns and is one of the leading causes of childhood neurodevelopmental disabilities; the underlying molecular networks are poorly defined. In neurons, retrotransposons LINE-1 (L1) are an active source of genomic mosaicism that is deregulated in several neurological disorders; early life experience has been shown to regulate L1 activity in mice. Methods: Very preterm infants were randomized to receive standard care or early intervention. L1 methylation was measured at birth and at hospital discharge. At 12 and 36 months, infants’ neurodevelopment was evaluated with the Griffiths Scales. L1 methylation and CNVs were measured in mouse brain areas at embryonic and postnatal stages. Results: Here we report that L1 promoter is hypomethylated in preterm infants at birth and that an early intervention program, based on enhanced maternal care and positive multisensory stimulation, restores L1 methylation levels comparable to healthy newborns and ameliorates neurodevelopment in childhood. We further show that L1 activity is fine-tuned in the perinatal mouse brain, suggesting a sensitive and vulnerable window for the L1 epigenetic setting. Conclusions: Our results open the field on the inspection of L1 activity as a novel molecular and predictive approach to infants’ prematurity-related neurodevelopmental outcomes. Trial registration: ClinicalTrial.gov (NCT02983513). Registered on 6 December 2016, retrospectively registered.

Early maternal care restores LINE-1 methylation and enhances neurodevelopment in preterm infants / C. Fontana, F. Marasca, L. Provitera, S. Mancinelli, N. Pesenti, S. Sinha, S. Passera, S. Abrignani, F. Mosca, S. Lodato, B. Bodega, M. Fumagalli. - In: BMC MEDICINE. - ISSN 1741-7015. - 19:1(2021 Dec), pp. 42.1-42.16. [10.1186/s12916-020-01896-0]

Early maternal care restores LINE-1 methylation and enhances neurodevelopment in preterm infants

C. Fontana
Primo
;
F. Marasca
Secondo
;
L. Provitera;S. Sinha;S. Passera;S. Abrignani;F. Mosca;B. Bodega
Penultimo
;
M. Fumagalli
2021

Abstract

Background: Preterm birth affects almost 9–11% of newborns and is one of the leading causes of childhood neurodevelopmental disabilities; the underlying molecular networks are poorly defined. In neurons, retrotransposons LINE-1 (L1) are an active source of genomic mosaicism that is deregulated in several neurological disorders; early life experience has been shown to regulate L1 activity in mice. Methods: Very preterm infants were randomized to receive standard care or early intervention. L1 methylation was measured at birth and at hospital discharge. At 12 and 36 months, infants’ neurodevelopment was evaluated with the Griffiths Scales. L1 methylation and CNVs were measured in mouse brain areas at embryonic and postnatal stages. Results: Here we report that L1 promoter is hypomethylated in preterm infants at birth and that an early intervention program, based on enhanced maternal care and positive multisensory stimulation, restores L1 methylation levels comparable to healthy newborns and ameliorates neurodevelopment in childhood. We further show that L1 activity is fine-tuned in the perinatal mouse brain, suggesting a sensitive and vulnerable window for the L1 epigenetic setting. Conclusions: Our results open the field on the inspection of L1 activity as a novel molecular and predictive approach to infants’ prematurity-related neurodevelopmental outcomes. Trial registration: ClinicalTrial.gov (NCT02983513). Registered on 6 December 2016, retrospectively registered.
Early maternal care; LINE1 methylation; Neurodevelopment; Prematurity
Settore BIO/11 - Biologia Molecolare
5-feb-2021
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2434/824009
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