Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) represent to date the leading cause of mortality in both genders in the developed countries. In this context, a strong need for CVD prevention is emerging through lifestyle modification and nutrition. In fact, several studies linked CVD with unhealthy nutrition, alcohol consumption, stress, and smoking, together with a low level of physical activity. Thus, the primary aim is to prevent and reduce CVD risk factors, such as impaired lipid and glycemic profiles, high blood pressure and obesity. Different types of diet have been, therefore, established to optimize the approach regarding this issue such as the Mediterranean diet, Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension diet (DASH), vegetarian diet, ketogenic diet, and Japanese diet. Depending on the diet type, recommendations generally emphasize subjects to increase vegetables, fruits, whole grains, and pulses consumption, but discourage or recommend eliminating red meat, sweets, and sugar-sweetened beverages, along with processed foods that are high in sugar, salt, fat, or low in dietary fiber. In particular, we evaluated and compared the peculiar aspects of these well-known dietary patterns and, thus, this review evaluates the critical factors that increase CVD risk and the potential application and benefits of nutritional protocols to ameliorate dietary and lifestyle patterns for CVD prevention.

What is the best diet for cardiovascular wellness? A comparison of different nutritional models / S. Migliaccio, C. Brasacchio, F. Pivari, C. Salzano, L. Barrea, G. Muscogiuri, S. Savastano, A. Colao. - In: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF OBESITY SUPPLEMENTS. - ISSN 2046-2166. - 10:1(2020 Jul), pp. 50-61. [10.1038/s41367-020-0018-0]

What is the best diet for cardiovascular wellness? A comparison of different nutritional models

C. Brasacchio;F. Pivari;
2020-07

Abstract

Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) represent to date the leading cause of mortality in both genders in the developed countries. In this context, a strong need for CVD prevention is emerging through lifestyle modification and nutrition. In fact, several studies linked CVD with unhealthy nutrition, alcohol consumption, stress, and smoking, together with a low level of physical activity. Thus, the primary aim is to prevent and reduce CVD risk factors, such as impaired lipid and glycemic profiles, high blood pressure and obesity. Different types of diet have been, therefore, established to optimize the approach regarding this issue such as the Mediterranean diet, Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension diet (DASH), vegetarian diet, ketogenic diet, and Japanese diet. Depending on the diet type, recommendations generally emphasize subjects to increase vegetables, fruits, whole grains, and pulses consumption, but discourage or recommend eliminating red meat, sweets, and sugar-sweetened beverages, along with processed foods that are high in sugar, salt, fat, or low in dietary fiber. In particular, we evaluated and compared the peculiar aspects of these well-known dietary patterns and, thus, this review evaluates the critical factors that increase CVD risk and the potential application and benefits of nutritional protocols to ameliorate dietary and lifestyle patterns for CVD prevention.
Settore MED/49 - Scienze Tecniche Dietetiche Applicate
Settore BIO/10 - Biochimica
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2434/812596
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