Objectives: A high dairy protein intake in infancy, maternal pre-pregnancy BMI, and delivery mode are documented early programming factors that modulate the later risk of obesity and other health outcomes, but the mechanisms of action are not understood. Methods: The Childhood Obesity Project is a European multicenter, double-blind, randomized clinical trial that enrolled healthy infants. Participating infants were either breastfed (BF) or randomized to receive higher (HP) or lower protein (LP) content formula in the first year of life. At the ages 5.5 years (n = 276) and 8 years (n = 232), we determined plasma metabolites by liquid chromatography tandem-mass-spectrometry of which 226 and 185 passed quality control at 5.5 years and 8 years, respectively. We assessed the effects of infant feeding, maternal pre-pregnancy BMI, smoking in pregnancy, delivery mode, parity, birth weight and length, and weight gain (0–24 months) on the metabolome at 5.5 and 8 years. Results: At 5.5 years, plasma alpha-ketoglutarate and the acylcarnitine/BCAA ratios tended to be higher in the HP than in the LP group, but no metabolite reached statistical significance (Pbonferroni>0.09). There were no group differences at 8 years. Quantification of the impact of early programming factors revealed that the intervention group explained 0.6% of metabolome variance at both time points. Except for country of residence that explained 16% and 12% at 5.5 years and 8 years, respectively, none of the other factors explained considerably more variance than expected by chance. Conclusions: Plasma metabolome was largely unaffected by feeding choice and other early programming factors and we could not prove the existence of a long term programming effect of the plasma metabolome.

Impact of infant protein supply and other early life factors on plasma metabolome at 5.5 and 8 years of age : a randomized trial / F.F. Kirchberg, C. Hellmuth, M. Totzauer, O. Uhl, R. Closa-Monasterolo, J. Escribano, D. Gruszfeld, K. Gradowska, E. Verduci, B. Mariani, M. Moretti, D. Rousseaux, B. Koletzko. - In: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF OBESITY. - ISSN 0307-0565. - 44:1(2020 Jan), pp. 69-81.

Impact of infant protein supply and other early life factors on plasma metabolome at 5.5 and 8 years of age : a randomized trial

Verduci E.;Mariani B.;
2020-01

Abstract

Objectives: A high dairy protein intake in infancy, maternal pre-pregnancy BMI, and delivery mode are documented early programming factors that modulate the later risk of obesity and other health outcomes, but the mechanisms of action are not understood. Methods: The Childhood Obesity Project is a European multicenter, double-blind, randomized clinical trial that enrolled healthy infants. Participating infants were either breastfed (BF) or randomized to receive higher (HP) or lower protein (LP) content formula in the first year of life. At the ages 5.5 years (n = 276) and 8 years (n = 232), we determined plasma metabolites by liquid chromatography tandem-mass-spectrometry of which 226 and 185 passed quality control at 5.5 years and 8 years, respectively. We assessed the effects of infant feeding, maternal pre-pregnancy BMI, smoking in pregnancy, delivery mode, parity, birth weight and length, and weight gain (0–24 months) on the metabolome at 5.5 and 8 years. Results: At 5.5 years, plasma alpha-ketoglutarate and the acylcarnitine/BCAA ratios tended to be higher in the HP than in the LP group, but no metabolite reached statistical significance (Pbonferroni>0.09). There were no group differences at 8 years. Quantification of the impact of early programming factors revealed that the intervention group explained 0.6% of metabolome variance at both time points. Except for country of residence that explained 16% and 12% at 5.5 years and 8 years, respectively, none of the other factors explained considerably more variance than expected by chance. Conclusions: Plasma metabolome was largely unaffected by feeding choice and other early programming factors and we could not prove the existence of a long term programming effect of the plasma metabolome.
Settore MED/38 - Pediatria Generale e Specialistica
Long-term effects of early nutrition on later health
INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF OBESITY
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2434/812158
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