Context and Objective The Controlled Antenatal Thyroid Screening (CATS) study investigated treatment of suboptimal gestational thyroid function (SGTF) on childhood cognition and found no difference in intelligence quotient (IQ) at 3 years between children of treated and untreated SGTF mothers. We have measured IQ in the same children at age 9.5 years and included children from normal gestational thyroid function (normal-GTF) mothers. Design, Setting, and Participants One examiner, blinded to participant group, assessed children's IQ (Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children, Fourth Edition UK), long-term memory, and motor function (Developmental Neuropsychological Assessment II) from children of 119 treated and 98 untreated SGTF mothers plus children of 232 mothers with normal-GTF. Logistic regression explored the odds and percentages of an IQ < 85 in the groups. Results There was no difference in IQ < 85 between children of mothers with normal-GTF and combined SGTF, i.e., treated and untreated (fully adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 1.15 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.52, 2.51]; P = 0.731). Furthermore, there was no significant effect of treatment [untreated OR = 1.33 (95% CI 0.53, 3.34); treated OR = 0.75 (95% CI 0.27, 2.06) P = 0.576]. IQ < 85 was 6.03% in normal-GTF, 7.56% in treated, and 11.22% in untreated groups. Analyses accounting for treated-SGTF women with free thyroxine > 97.5th percentile of the entire CATS-I cohort revealed no significant effect on a child's IQ < 85 in CATS-II. IQ at age 3 predicted IQ at age 9.5 (P < 0.0001) and accounted for 45% of the variation. Conclusions Maternal thyroxine during pregnancy did not improve child cognition at age 9.5 years. Our findings confirmed CATS-I and suggest that the lack of treatment effect may be a result of the similar proportion of IQ < 85 in children of women with normal-GTF and SGTF.

Controlled Antenatal Thyroid Screening II: Effect of Treating Maternal Suboptimal Thyroid Function on Child Cognition / C. Hales, P.N. Taylor, S. Channon, R. Paradice, K. McEwan, L. Zhang, M. Gyedu, A. Bakhsh, O. Okosieme, I. Muller, M.S. Draman, J.W. Gregory, C. Dayan, J.H. Lazarus, D. Aled Rees, M. Ludgate. - In: THE JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGY AND METABOLISM. - ISSN 0021-972X. - 103:4(2018), pp. 1583-1591. [10.1210/jc.2017-02378]

Controlled Antenatal Thyroid Screening II: Effect of Treating Maternal Suboptimal Thyroid Function on Child Cognition

I. Muller;
2018

Abstract

Context and Objective The Controlled Antenatal Thyroid Screening (CATS) study investigated treatment of suboptimal gestational thyroid function (SGTF) on childhood cognition and found no difference in intelligence quotient (IQ) at 3 years between children of treated and untreated SGTF mothers. We have measured IQ in the same children at age 9.5 years and included children from normal gestational thyroid function (normal-GTF) mothers. Design, Setting, and Participants One examiner, blinded to participant group, assessed children's IQ (Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children, Fourth Edition UK), long-term memory, and motor function (Developmental Neuropsychological Assessment II) from children of 119 treated and 98 untreated SGTF mothers plus children of 232 mothers with normal-GTF. Logistic regression explored the odds and percentages of an IQ < 85 in the groups. Results There was no difference in IQ < 85 between children of mothers with normal-GTF and combined SGTF, i.e., treated and untreated (fully adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 1.15 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.52, 2.51]; P = 0.731). Furthermore, there was no significant effect of treatment [untreated OR = 1.33 (95% CI 0.53, 3.34); treated OR = 0.75 (95% CI 0.27, 2.06) P = 0.576]. IQ < 85 was 6.03% in normal-GTF, 7.56% in treated, and 11.22% in untreated groups. Analyses accounting for treated-SGTF women with free thyroxine > 97.5th percentile of the entire CATS-I cohort revealed no significant effect on a child's IQ < 85 in CATS-II. IQ at age 3 predicted IQ at age 9.5 (P < 0.0001) and accounted for 45% of the variation. Conclusions Maternal thyroxine during pregnancy did not improve child cognition at age 9.5 years. Our findings confirmed CATS-I and suggest that the lack of treatment effect may be a result of the similar proportion of IQ < 85 in children of women with normal-GTF and SGTF.
Adult; Child; Cognition; Female; Humans; Hypothyroidism; Intelligence; Intelligence Tests; Male; Pregnancy; Pregnancy Complications; Prenatal Diagnosis; Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects; Thyroid Function Tests; Thyroxine
Settore MED/13 - Endocrinologia
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2434/806821
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