In the olive production sector, which is increasingly expanding beyond the borders of the Mediterranean basin, harvesting is the most demanding phase, from both an economic and organisational point of view. Traditional olive orchards are still predominant, with centuries-old and large plants, and are characterised by the gradual ripening of drupes and irregular planting patterns. Even though the structural conversion of these olive orchards into more modern cultivations may be difficult owing to their historical, monumental, and landscaping importance, as well as the existing legal restrictions, supporting a "modernisation" process aimed at mechanising the main farming operations remains a priority. Technological innovation is, therefore, a primary objective for Mediterranean olive growing, as well as the enhancement of its strengths. The present study aimed to assess different olive harvesting sites, considering the technical, economic, and environmental aspects to develop a better version of the "olive harvesting database". The applied methodology, also called the "modular approach", represents a useful tool for application in unitary process assessment to obtain a comprehensive database of diverse agricultural operations. Eight olive harvesting systems were compared: six highly mechanised scenarios, one based on mechanical-aided harvesting, and the final one based on fully manual harvesting. The mechanised systems obtained a better performance in terms of working capacity, as only 3.5 h ha-1 were needed to harvest 12 tonnes using a self-propelled trunk shaker. In addition, the economic results revealed that mechanical harvesting, diversely from manual or aided harvesting, is the only way to decrease production costs. From an environmental point of view, manual and mechanical-aided harvesting showed the best performance in terms of impact per hour. However, using the mass-based unit (one kilogramme of harvested olives), the results were the opposite and this could be very relevant for the ecoprofile of olive oil.

Harvesting system sustainability in Mediterranean olive cultivation: other principal cultivar / B. Bernardi, G. Falcone, T. Stillitano, S. Benalia, J. Bacenetti, A.I. De Luca. - In: SCIENCE OF THE TOTAL ENVIRONMENT. - ISSN 0048-9697. - 2020:(2020). [Epub ahead of print] [10.1016/j.scitotenv.2020.142508]

Harvesting system sustainability in Mediterranean olive cultivation: other principal cultivar

J. Bacenetti
Penultimo
;
2020

Abstract

In the olive production sector, which is increasingly expanding beyond the borders of the Mediterranean basin, harvesting is the most demanding phase, from both an economic and organisational point of view. Traditional olive orchards are still predominant, with centuries-old and large plants, and are characterised by the gradual ripening of drupes and irregular planting patterns. Even though the structural conversion of these olive orchards into more modern cultivations may be difficult owing to their historical, monumental, and landscaping importance, as well as the existing legal restrictions, supporting a "modernisation" process aimed at mechanising the main farming operations remains a priority. Technological innovation is, therefore, a primary objective for Mediterranean olive growing, as well as the enhancement of its strengths. The present study aimed to assess different olive harvesting sites, considering the technical, economic, and environmental aspects to develop a better version of the "olive harvesting database". The applied methodology, also called the "modular approach", represents a useful tool for application in unitary process assessment to obtain a comprehensive database of diverse agricultural operations. Eight olive harvesting systems were compared: six highly mechanised scenarios, one based on mechanical-aided harvesting, and the final one based on fully manual harvesting. The mechanised systems obtained a better performance in terms of working capacity, as only 3.5 h ha-1 were needed to harvest 12 tonnes using a self-propelled trunk shaker. In addition, the economic results revealed that mechanical harvesting, diversely from manual or aided harvesting, is the only way to decrease production costs. From an environmental point of view, manual and mechanical-aided harvesting showed the best performance in terms of impact per hour. However, using the mass-based unit (one kilogramme of harvested olives), the results were the opposite and this could be very relevant for the ecoprofile of olive oil.
Machinery; Modular life cycle assessment (LCA); Olive harvesting; Production costs; Technical performance
Settore AGR/09 - Meccanica Agraria
25-set-2020
Article (author)
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
1-s2.0-S004896972036037X-main.pdf

embargo fino al 25/09/2022

Tipologia: Post-print, accepted manuscript ecc. (versione accettata dall'editore)
Dimensione 2.13 MB
Formato Adobe PDF
2.13 MB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri
Pubblicazioni consigliate

Caricamento pubblicazioni consigliate

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2434/767652
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 8
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 8
social impact