OBJECTIVES: Physical activity (PA) is presumed to decline during childhood and adolescence, but only few long-term studies about PA development during this period of life exist. We assessed PA and sedentary behavior (SB) over a 5-year period to gain a better understanding of the extent of change in activity and potential influencing factors. METHODS: PA and SB of 600 children from the Childhood Obesity Project were objectively measured with the SenseWear Armband 2 at the ages of 6, 8, and 11 years, resulting in 1254 observations. Longitudinal changes of total PA, moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), light physical activity (LPA), and SB were modeled with mixed-effects models. RESULTS: Total PA revealed a significant quadratic decline with age (P < .001), resulting in a change of total PA by -75.3 minutes per day from 6 to 11 years. LPA linearly declined (P < .001) by 44.6 minutes per day, MVPA quadratically declined (P < .001) by an overall 30.7 minutes, whereas SB increased significantly (+107 minutes; P = .001). Boys showed a steeper decline in LPA (P = .003) and MVPA (P < .001) than did girls. Higher fat mass index and BMI z scores were associated with lower levels of total PA and MVPA and higher levels of SB (all P < .001). CONCLUSIONS: We showed that PA decreased, and SB increased in earlier years than previously thought. MVPA remained relatively stable until 8 years, but revealed a drop-off at 11 years, identifying this period as a crucial time for intervention.

Physical activity and sedentary behavior from 6 to 11 years / P. Schwarzfischer, D. Gruszfeld, A. Stolarczyk, N. Ferre, J. Escribano, D. Rousseaux, M. Moretti, B. Mariani, E. Verduci, B. Koletzko, V. Grote. - In: PEDIATRICS. - ISSN 0031-4005. - 143:1(2019 Jan). [10.1542/peds.2018-0994]

Physical activity and sedentary behavior from 6 to 11 years

Mariani B.;Verduci E.;
2019-01

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Physical activity (PA) is presumed to decline during childhood and adolescence, but only few long-term studies about PA development during this period of life exist. We assessed PA and sedentary behavior (SB) over a 5-year period to gain a better understanding of the extent of change in activity and potential influencing factors. METHODS: PA and SB of 600 children from the Childhood Obesity Project were objectively measured with the SenseWear Armband 2 at the ages of 6, 8, and 11 years, resulting in 1254 observations. Longitudinal changes of total PA, moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), light physical activity (LPA), and SB were modeled with mixed-effects models. RESULTS: Total PA revealed a significant quadratic decline with age (P < .001), resulting in a change of total PA by -75.3 minutes per day from 6 to 11 years. LPA linearly declined (P < .001) by 44.6 minutes per day, MVPA quadratically declined (P < .001) by an overall 30.7 minutes, whereas SB increased significantly (+107 minutes; P = .001). Boys showed a steeper decline in LPA (P = .003) and MVPA (P < .001) than did girls. Higher fat mass index and BMI z scores were associated with lower levels of total PA and MVPA and higher levels of SB (all P < .001). CONCLUSIONS: We showed that PA decreased, and SB increased in earlier years than previously thought. MVPA remained relatively stable until 8 years, but revealed a drop-off at 11 years, identifying this period as a crucial time for intervention.
Accelerometry; Age Factors; Child; Double-Blind Method; Exercise; Female; Humans; Longitudinal Studies; Male; Pediatric Obesity; Body Mass Index; Sedentary Behavior
Settore MED/38 - Pediatria Generale e Specialistica
PEDIATRICS
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2434/749602
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