Abnormal sleep oscillations have recently been proposed as endophenotypes of schizophrenia. However, optimization of methodological approaches is still necessary to standardize analyses of their microstructural characteristics. Additionally, some relevant features of these oscillations remain unexplored in pathological conditions. Among others, slow wave traveling is a promising proxy for diurnal processes of brain connectivity and excitability. The study of slow oscillations propagation appears particularly relevant when schizophrenia is conceptualized as a dys-connectivity syndrome. Given the rising knowledge on the neurobiological mechanisms underlying slow wave traveling, this measure might offer substantial advantages over other approaches in investigating brain connectivity. Herein we: 1) confirm the stability of our previous findings on slow waves and sleep spindles in FDRs using different automated algorithms, and 2) report the dynamics of slow wave traveling in FDRs of Schizophrenia patients. A 256-channel, high-density EEG system was employed to record a whole night of sleep of 16 FDRs and 16 age- and gender-matched control subjects. A recently developed, open source toolbox was used for slow wave visualization and detection. Slow waves were confirmed to be significantly smaller in FDRs compared to the control group. Additionally, several traveling parameters were analyzed. Traveled distances were found to be significantly reduced in FDRs, whereas origins showed a different topographical pattern of distribution from control subjects. In contrast, local speed did not differ between groups. Overall, these results suggest that slow wave traveling might be a viable method to study pathological conditions interfering with brain connectivity.

Slow wave oscillations in Schizophrenia First-Degree Relatives: A confirmatory analysis and feasibility study on slow wave traveling / A. Castelnovo, M. Zago, C. Casetta, C. Zangani, F. Donati, M. Canevini, B.A. Riedner, G. Tononi, F. Ferrarelli, S. Sarasso, A. D'Agostino. - In: SCHIZOPHRENIA RESEARCH. - ISSN 0920-9964. - 221(2020 Jul), pp. 37-43.

Slow wave oscillations in Schizophrenia First-Degree Relatives: A confirmatory analysis and feasibility study on slow wave traveling

A. Castelnovo
Primo
;
M. Zago
Secondo
;
C. Casetta;C. Zangani;F. Donati;M. Canevini;F. Ferrarelli
Penultimo
;
S. Sarasso
Ultimo
;
A. D'Agostino
2020-07

Abstract

Abnormal sleep oscillations have recently been proposed as endophenotypes of schizophrenia. However, optimization of methodological approaches is still necessary to standardize analyses of their microstructural characteristics. Additionally, some relevant features of these oscillations remain unexplored in pathological conditions. Among others, slow wave traveling is a promising proxy for diurnal processes of brain connectivity and excitability. The study of slow oscillations propagation appears particularly relevant when schizophrenia is conceptualized as a dys-connectivity syndrome. Given the rising knowledge on the neurobiological mechanisms underlying slow wave traveling, this measure might offer substantial advantages over other approaches in investigating brain connectivity. Herein we: 1) confirm the stability of our previous findings on slow waves and sleep spindles in FDRs using different automated algorithms, and 2) report the dynamics of slow wave traveling in FDRs of Schizophrenia patients. A 256-channel, high-density EEG system was employed to record a whole night of sleep of 16 FDRs and 16 age- and gender-matched control subjects. A recently developed, open source toolbox was used for slow wave visualization and detection. Slow waves were confirmed to be significantly smaller in FDRs compared to the control group. Additionally, several traveling parameters were analyzed. Traveled distances were found to be significantly reduced in FDRs, whereas origins showed a different topographical pattern of distribution from control subjects. In contrast, local speed did not differ between groups. Overall, these results suggest that slow wave traveling might be a viable method to study pathological conditions interfering with brain connectivity.
first-degree relatives; psychosis; sleep oscillations; biomarkers; dysconnectivity; EEG toolbox; thalamus;
Settore MED/25 - Psichiatria
Settore BIO/09 - Fisiologia
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2434/725404
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