Objective: Among obesity-associated metabolic diseases, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) represents an increasing public health issue due to its emerging association with atherogenic dyslipidemia and cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). The lower prevalence of NAFLD in pre-menopausal women compared with men or post-menopausal women led us to hypothesize that the female-inherent ability to counteract this pathology might strongly rely on estrogen signaling. In female mammals, estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) is highly expressed in the liver, where it acts as a sensor of the nutritional status and adapts the metabolism to the reproductive needs. As in the male liver this receptor is little expressed, we here hypothesize that hepatic ERα might account for sex differences in the ability of males and females to cope with an excess of dietary lipids and counteract the accumulation of lipids in the liver. Methods: Through liver metabolomics and transcriptomics we analyzed the relevance of hepatic ERα in the metabolic response of males and females to a diet highly enriched in fats (HFD) as a model of diet-induced obesity. Results: The study shows that the hepatic ERα strongly contributes to the sex-specific response to an HFD and its action accounts for opposite consequences for hepatic health in males and females. Conclusion: This study identified hepatic ERα as a novel target for the design of sex-specific therapies against fatty liver and its cardio-metabolic consequences.

Hepatic ERα accounts for sex differences in the ability to cope with an excess of dietary lipids / C. Meda, M. Barone, N. Mitro, F. Lolli, S. Pedretti, D. Caruso, A. Maggi, S. Della Torre. - In: MOLECULAR METABOLISM. - ISSN 2212-8778. - 32(2020 Feb), pp. 97-108. [10.1016/j.molmet.2019.12.009]

Hepatic ERα accounts for sex differences in the ability to cope with an excess of dietary lipids

C. Meda;M. Barone;N. Mitro;F. Lolli;S. Pedretti;D. Caruso;A. Maggi;S. Della Torre
2020-02

Abstract

Objective: Among obesity-associated metabolic diseases, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) represents an increasing public health issue due to its emerging association with atherogenic dyslipidemia and cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). The lower prevalence of NAFLD in pre-menopausal women compared with men or post-menopausal women led us to hypothesize that the female-inherent ability to counteract this pathology might strongly rely on estrogen signaling. In female mammals, estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) is highly expressed in the liver, where it acts as a sensor of the nutritional status and adapts the metabolism to the reproductive needs. As in the male liver this receptor is little expressed, we here hypothesize that hepatic ERα might account for sex differences in the ability of males and females to cope with an excess of dietary lipids and counteract the accumulation of lipids in the liver. Methods: Through liver metabolomics and transcriptomics we analyzed the relevance of hepatic ERα in the metabolic response of males and females to a diet highly enriched in fats (HFD) as a model of diet-induced obesity. Results: The study shows that the hepatic ERα strongly contributes to the sex-specific response to an HFD and its action accounts for opposite consequences for hepatic health in males and females. Conclusion: This study identified hepatic ERα as a novel target for the design of sex-specific therapies against fatty liver and its cardio-metabolic consequences.
Amino acids; ERα; Estrogen; Fatty liver; Liver metabolism; Sex differences
Settore BIO/14 - Farmacologia
Settore BIO/10 - Biochimica
24-dic-2019
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2434/705661
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