Climate change impacts are non uniformly distributed over the globe. Mountains have a peculiar response to large scale variations, documented by elevation gradients of surface temperature increase observed over many mountain ranges in the last decades. Significant changes of precipitation are expected in the changing climate and orographic effects are important in determining the amount of rainfall at a given location. It thus becomes particularly important to understand how orographic precipitation responds to global warming and to anthropogenic forcing. Here, using a large rain gauge dataset over the European Alpine region, we show that the distribution of annual precipitation among the lowlands and the mountains has varied over time, with an increase of the precipitation at the high elevations compared to the low elevations starting in the mid 20 century and peaking in the 1980s. The simultaneous increase and peak of anthropogenic aerosol load is discussed as a possible source for this interdecadal change. These results provide new insights to further our understanding and improve predictions of anthropic effects on mountain precipitations, which are fundamental for water security and management.

Variability of orographic enhancement of precipitation in the Alpine region / A. Napoli, A. Crespi, F. Ragone, M. Maugeri, C. Pasquero. - In: SCIENTIFIC REPORTS. - ISSN 2045-2322. - 9:1(2019), pp. 13352.1-13352.8. [10.1038/s41598-019-49974-5]

Variability of orographic enhancement of precipitation in the Alpine region

Crespi A.;Maugeri M.;
2019

Abstract

Climate change impacts are non uniformly distributed over the globe. Mountains have a peculiar response to large scale variations, documented by elevation gradients of surface temperature increase observed over many mountain ranges in the last decades. Significant changes of precipitation are expected in the changing climate and orographic effects are important in determining the amount of rainfall at a given location. It thus becomes particularly important to understand how orographic precipitation responds to global warming and to anthropogenic forcing. Here, using a large rain gauge dataset over the European Alpine region, we show that the distribution of annual precipitation among the lowlands and the mountains has varied over time, with an increase of the precipitation at the high elevations compared to the low elevations starting in the mid 20 century and peaking in the 1980s. The simultaneous increase and peak of anthropogenic aerosol load is discussed as a possible source for this interdecadal change. These results provide new insights to further our understanding and improve predictions of anthropic effects on mountain precipitations, which are fundamental for water security and management.
Settore FIS/06 - Fisica per il Sistema Terra e Il Mezzo Circumterrestre
Article (author)
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
A93_Napoli_et_al_2019_SR.pdf

accesso aperto

Tipologia: Publisher's version/PDF
Dimensione 1.87 MB
Formato Adobe PDF
1.87 MB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri
Pubblicazioni consigliate

Caricamento pubblicazioni consigliate

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2434/698495
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 2
  • Scopus 25
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 25
social impact