Purpose. Although maximal heart rate (HRmax) is used widely to assess exercise intensity in training, there are limited data with regards to the validity of age-based prediction equations of HRmax in volleyball players. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to compare the measured-HRmax of two prediction equations (Fox-HRmax = 220-age and Tanaka-HRmax = 208-0.7 × age) in young female volleyball players. Methods. The study involved 47 volleyball players (age 13.39 ± 2.01 years, body mass 54.0 ± 10.8 kg, height 162.7 ± 10.2 cm) who performed a graded exercise field test (20 m shuttle run endurance test) to assess HRmax. Measured-HRmax values were compared with the Fox and Tanaka prediction equations. Results. The results showed that mean scores for HRmax significantly differed between measured and predicted values (p < 0.001, Latin small letter Eng2 = 0.49). Post-hoc tests revealed that Fox-HRmax overestimated measured-HRmax (mean difference 5.7 bpm; 95% CI [3.0, 8.5]), whereas Tanaka-HRmax was similar to measured-HRmax (-2.2 bpm; 95% CI [-4.9, 0.4]). HRmax did not correlate with age (r = 0.16, p = 0.291). Conclusions. The results of this study failed to validate the widely used '220-age' formula in volleyball players. Coaches and fitness trainers should take into account that the overestimation of HRmax by the Fox equation might lead to prescribing exercise at a higher intensity than what is targeted. Therefore, the Tanaka equation appears to offer a more accurate prediction equation of HRmax than the Fox equation in young female volleyball players.

The 220-age formula overestimates maximal heart rate in adolescent female volleyball players: a preliminary study / P. Theo Nikolaidis, J. Padulo, H. Chtourou, G. Torres-Luque, J. Afonso, J. Heller. - In: HUMAN MOVEMENT. - ISSN 1899-1955. - 15:3(2014 Sep 01), pp. 166-170. [10.1515/humo-2015-0007]

The 220-age formula overestimates maximal heart rate in adolescent female volleyball players: a preliminary study

J. Padulo
Secondo
Writing – Original Draft Preparation
;
2014-09-01

Abstract

Purpose. Although maximal heart rate (HRmax) is used widely to assess exercise intensity in training, there are limited data with regards to the validity of age-based prediction equations of HRmax in volleyball players. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to compare the measured-HRmax of two prediction equations (Fox-HRmax = 220-age and Tanaka-HRmax = 208-0.7 × age) in young female volleyball players. Methods. The study involved 47 volleyball players (age 13.39 ± 2.01 years, body mass 54.0 ± 10.8 kg, height 162.7 ± 10.2 cm) who performed a graded exercise field test (20 m shuttle run endurance test) to assess HRmax. Measured-HRmax values were compared with the Fox and Tanaka prediction equations. Results. The results showed that mean scores for HRmax significantly differed between measured and predicted values (p < 0.001, Latin small letter Eng2 = 0.49). Post-hoc tests revealed that Fox-HRmax overestimated measured-HRmax (mean difference 5.7 bpm; 95% CI [3.0, 8.5]), whereas Tanaka-HRmax was similar to measured-HRmax (-2.2 bpm; 95% CI [-4.9, 0.4]). HRmax did not correlate with age (r = 0.16, p = 0.291). Conclusions. The results of this study failed to validate the widely used '220-age' formula in volleyball players. Coaches and fitness trainers should take into account that the overestimation of HRmax by the Fox equation might lead to prescribing exercise at a higher intensity than what is targeted. Therefore, the Tanaka equation appears to offer a more accurate prediction equation of HRmax than the Fox equation in young female volleyball players.
age groups; cardiac rate; graded exercise test; metabolic demand; prediction equations; shuttle run; training intensit;
Settore M-EDF/02 - Metodi e Didattiche delle Attivita' Sportive
Article (author)
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
Nikolaidis 2014 HM Estimating maximal heart rate with the 220age formula in adolescent female volleyball players a preliminary study.pdf

accesso aperto

Tipologia: Publisher's version/PDF
Dimensione 2.18 MB
Formato Adobe PDF
2.18 MB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri
Pubblicazioni consigliate

Caricamento pubblicazioni consigliate

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2434/671181
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 3
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? ND
social impact