Preclinical and clinical studies suggest that many food molecules could interact with drug transporters and metabolizing enzymes through different mechanisms, which are predictive of what would be observed clinically. Given the recent incorporation of dietary modifications or supplements in traditional medicine, an increase in potential food-drug interactions has also appeared. The objective of this article is to review data regarding the influence of food on drug efficacy. Data from Google Scholar, PubMed, and Scopus databases was reviewed for publications on pharmaceutical, pharmacokinetic, and pharmacodynamic mechanisms. The following online resources were used to integrate functional and bioinformatic results: FooDB, Phenol-Explorer, Dr. Duke's Phytochemical and Ethnobotanical Databases, DrugBank, UniProt, and IUPHAR/BPS Guide to Pharmacology. A wide range of food compounds were shown to interact with proteins involved in drug pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic profiles, starting from drug oral bioavailability to enteric/hepatic transport and metabolism, blood transport, and systemic transport/metabolism. Knowledge of any food components that may interfere with drug efficacy is essential, and would provide a link for obtaining a holistic view for cancer, cardiovascular, musculoskeletal, or neurological therapies. However, preclinical interaction may be irrelevant to clinical interaction, and health professionals should be aware of the limitations if they intend to optimize the therapeutic effects of drugs.

Food bioactive compounds and their interference in drug pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic profiles / M. Briguglio, S. Hrelia, M. Malaguti, L. Serpe, R. Canaparo, B. Dell'Osso, R. Galentino, S. De Michele, C. Zanaboni Dina, M. Porta, G. Banfi. - In: PHARMACEUTICS. - ISSN 1999-4923. - 10:4(2018 Dec), pp. 277.1-277.22.

Food bioactive compounds and their interference in drug pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic profiles

M. Briguglio
;
B. Dell'Osso;
2018

Abstract

Preclinical and clinical studies suggest that many food molecules could interact with drug transporters and metabolizing enzymes through different mechanisms, which are predictive of what would be observed clinically. Given the recent incorporation of dietary modifications or supplements in traditional medicine, an increase in potential food-drug interactions has also appeared. The objective of this article is to review data regarding the influence of food on drug efficacy. Data from Google Scholar, PubMed, and Scopus databases was reviewed for publications on pharmaceutical, pharmacokinetic, and pharmacodynamic mechanisms. The following online resources were used to integrate functional and bioinformatic results: FooDB, Phenol-Explorer, Dr. Duke's Phytochemical and Ethnobotanical Databases, DrugBank, UniProt, and IUPHAR/BPS Guide to Pharmacology. A wide range of food compounds were shown to interact with proteins involved in drug pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic profiles, starting from drug oral bioavailability to enteric/hepatic transport and metabolism, blood transport, and systemic transport/metabolism. Knowledge of any food components that may interfere with drug efficacy is essential, and would provide a link for obtaining a holistic view for cancer, cardiovascular, musculoskeletal, or neurological therapies. However, preclinical interaction may be irrelevant to clinical interaction, and health professionals should be aware of the limitations if they intend to optimize the therapeutic effects of drugs.
Dietary supplements; Food-drug interactions; Herb-drug interactions; Nutraceutical; Pharmacologic processes; Precision medicine
Settore MED/25 - Psichiatria
Settore MED/49 - Scienze Tecniche Dietetiche Applicate
Settore BIO/14 - Farmacologia
2018
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2434/670641
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