OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the prescription modalities of general practitioners (GPs) and specialists in symptomatic osteoarthritis (OA) patients enrolled in the AMICA study. PATIENTS AND METHODS: This study started in 2001 as a cohort investigation of OA patients seen by 2764 GPs and 316 specialists. Enrolled were 28,981 patients with symptomatic OA of the hand, hip, or knee. RESULTS: GPs and physical medicine specialists treated OA less frequently with pharmacological therapy than rheumatologists (OR 0.35; CI 0.26 to 0.47) or orthopedic surgeons (OR 0.65; CI 0.54 to 0.77). Pharmacological therapies (alone or in association with nonpharmacological modalities) were selected by 97% of the GPs, 96% of the rheumatologists, 94% of the orthopedic surgeons, and 85% of the physical medicine specialists. In comparison with GPs, all of the specialists more frequently used disease-modifying OA drugs (DMOADs) (rheumatologists: OR 6.86, CI 6.03 to 7.80; orthopedic surgeons: OR 2.20, CI 1.94 to 2.49; physical medicine specialists: OR 2.11, CI 1.69 to 2.63). Nonpharmacological therapies were selected by 44% of the GPs, 54% of the rheumatologists, 71% of the orthopedic surgeons, and 90% of the physical medicine specialists. They were used alone uncommonly (by 3% of the GPs, 3% of the rheumatologists, 6% of the orthopedic surgeons, and 15% of the physical medicine specialists). GPs use nonpharmacological treatment less than specialists: OR 0.53; CI 0.47 to 0.60 versus rheumatologists; OR 0.20; CI 0.18 to 0.21 versus orthopedic surgeons; and OR 0.07; CI 0.05 to 0.09 versus physical medicine specialists. Ultrasound (US) (11%) and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) (7%) were the nonpharmacological therapies most frequently prescribed by GPs. Among the specialists, physical medicine specialists most frequently prescribed US (35%) and TENS (21%); US was also preferred by rheumatologists, whereas the orthopedic surgeon's choice was magnetotherapy (21%). Exercises and other passive or active rehabilitation strategies were prescribed for only 13% of the patients seen by GPs, but all 3 categories of specialists prescribed exercises and manual techniques far more frequently: rheumatologists, OR 1.63: 1.40 to 1.63; orthopedic surgeons, OR 1.67: 1.48 to 1.88; physical medicine specialists, OR 3.19: 2.66 to 3.82. CONCLUSIONS: Italian rheumatologists and orthopedic surgeons are the specialists who most frequently use pharmacological treatment for OA. Nonpharmacological treatment is used commonly among both GPs and specialists but rarely as single therapy. Exercise and passive or active rehabilitation strategies are not frequently prescribed, although they are recommended by all the published guidelines.

Analysis of pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic prescription patterns of general practitioners and specialists in the AMICA study / R. Scarpa, P. Sarzi Puttini, M.A. Cimmino, R. Caporali, F. Parazzini, A. Zaninelli, B. Canesi. - In: SEMINARS IN ARTHRITIS AND RHEUMATISM. - ISSN 0049-0172. - 35:Supp. 1(2005 Aug), pp. 24-30. [10.1016/j.semarthrit.2005.02.001]

Analysis of pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic prescription patterns of general practitioners and specialists in the AMICA study

P. Sarzi Puttini;R. Caporali;F. Parazzini;
2005-08

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the prescription modalities of general practitioners (GPs) and specialists in symptomatic osteoarthritis (OA) patients enrolled in the AMICA study. PATIENTS AND METHODS: This study started in 2001 as a cohort investigation of OA patients seen by 2764 GPs and 316 specialists. Enrolled were 28,981 patients with symptomatic OA of the hand, hip, or knee. RESULTS: GPs and physical medicine specialists treated OA less frequently with pharmacological therapy than rheumatologists (OR 0.35; CI 0.26 to 0.47) or orthopedic surgeons (OR 0.65; CI 0.54 to 0.77). Pharmacological therapies (alone or in association with nonpharmacological modalities) were selected by 97% of the GPs, 96% of the rheumatologists, 94% of the orthopedic surgeons, and 85% of the physical medicine specialists. In comparison with GPs, all of the specialists more frequently used disease-modifying OA drugs (DMOADs) (rheumatologists: OR 6.86, CI 6.03 to 7.80; orthopedic surgeons: OR 2.20, CI 1.94 to 2.49; physical medicine specialists: OR 2.11, CI 1.69 to 2.63). Nonpharmacological therapies were selected by 44% of the GPs, 54% of the rheumatologists, 71% of the orthopedic surgeons, and 90% of the physical medicine specialists. They were used alone uncommonly (by 3% of the GPs, 3% of the rheumatologists, 6% of the orthopedic surgeons, and 15% of the physical medicine specialists). GPs use nonpharmacological treatment less than specialists: OR 0.53; CI 0.47 to 0.60 versus rheumatologists; OR 0.20; CI 0.18 to 0.21 versus orthopedic surgeons; and OR 0.07; CI 0.05 to 0.09 versus physical medicine specialists. Ultrasound (US) (11%) and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) (7%) were the nonpharmacological therapies most frequently prescribed by GPs. Among the specialists, physical medicine specialists most frequently prescribed US (35%) and TENS (21%); US was also preferred by rheumatologists, whereas the orthopedic surgeon's choice was magnetotherapy (21%). Exercises and other passive or active rehabilitation strategies were prescribed for only 13% of the patients seen by GPs, but all 3 categories of specialists prescribed exercises and manual techniques far more frequently: rheumatologists, OR 1.63: 1.40 to 1.63; orthopedic surgeons, OR 1.67: 1.48 to 1.88; physical medicine specialists, OR 3.19: 2.66 to 3.82. CONCLUSIONS: Italian rheumatologists and orthopedic surgeons are the specialists who most frequently use pharmacological treatment for OA. Nonpharmacological treatment is used commonly among both GPs and specialists but rarely as single therapy. Exercise and passive or active rehabilitation strategies are not frequently prescribed, although they are recommended by all the published guidelines.
Coxibs; NSAIDs; Osteoarthritis; Pharmacological treatment
Settore MED/40 - Ginecologia e Ostetricia
SEMINARS IN ARTHRITIS AND RHEUMATISM
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2434/66889
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