Traceability to a common reference ensures equivalence of results obtained by different assays. Traceability is achieved by an unbroken sequence of calibrations, using reference materials (RMs) that must be commutable. Using non-commutable RMs for calibration will introduce a bias in the calibrated method producing incorrect results for clinical samples (CS). Commutability was defined in 1973 as “the ability of an enzyme material to show inter-assay activity changes comparable to those of the same enzyme in human serum” and later extended as a characteristic of all RMs. However, the concept is still poorly understood and appreciated. Commutability assessment has been covered in CLSI guidelines and requires: (a) selection of 20 CS spanning the relevant concentration range; (b) analysis of both RM and CS with the pair of procedures; (c) data elaboration using regression analysis and calculation if RM fall within the 95% prediction interval defined by CS. This approach has been criticized and to improve it The International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine established a working group that recently finalized recommendations. Commutability is also a requirement for the applicability of external quality assessment (EQA) results in the evaluation of the performance of participating laboratories in terms of standardization of their measurements. Unfortunately, EQA materials are usually not validated for commutability.

Commutability of reference and control materials: an essential factor for assuring the quality of measurements in Laboratory Medicine / F. Braga, M. Panteghini. - In: CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND LABORATORY MEDICINE. - ISSN 1434-6621. - 57:7(2019), pp. 967-973. [10.1515/cclm-2019-0154]

Commutability of reference and control materials: an essential factor for assuring the quality of measurements in Laboratory Medicine

F. Braga;M. Panteghini
2019

Abstract

Traceability to a common reference ensures equivalence of results obtained by different assays. Traceability is achieved by an unbroken sequence of calibrations, using reference materials (RMs) that must be commutable. Using non-commutable RMs for calibration will introduce a bias in the calibrated method producing incorrect results for clinical samples (CS). Commutability was defined in 1973 as “the ability of an enzyme material to show inter-assay activity changes comparable to those of the same enzyme in human serum” and later extended as a characteristic of all RMs. However, the concept is still poorly understood and appreciated. Commutability assessment has been covered in CLSI guidelines and requires: (a) selection of 20 CS spanning the relevant concentration range; (b) analysis of both RM and CS with the pair of procedures; (c) data elaboration using regression analysis and calculation if RM fall within the 95% prediction interval defined by CS. This approach has been criticized and to improve it The International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine established a working group that recently finalized recommendations. Commutability is also a requirement for the applicability of external quality assessment (EQA) results in the evaluation of the performance of participating laboratories in terms of standardization of their measurements. Unfortunately, EQA materials are usually not validated for commutability.
commutability; standardization; uncertainty
Settore BIO/12 - Biochimica Clinica e Biologia Molecolare Clinica
2019
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2434/650699
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